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Will soon be mounting my scalextric sports track to a board. The track isn't huge so I see no need to run boost cables but I am a little concerned about the standard joins. Any tips to make sure electricity always flows? I don't think I can solder the track together from the top but I was thinking about some electricity paste. Put it in the end of the track before connecting together and tacking down??

Any ideas?

Thanks
James
 

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Hello jimgym

I would say that it depends on what state the track is in. I have an old Scalextric Classic track wich is pretty large and i have contected boost cables to it. The only problem i had at first was the "pins" that conects the electricity between each track, that they were not fitted correctly. And i solved that problem by bending the "pins" slightly up
, so that they would give a better conection. After that everything worked just fine. Regarding the ideá you have about using electricity paste, i don´t really know how that would work. Have never thought about it, but i guess that it may work aswell. Don´t however think that you will have to use paste if you bend the "pins".

How long is your track
Even if its not that large you may still benefit from using some booster cables, after all that will make the electricity flow even smother. I hope this helped you a bit, i´m no expert at all but since no one have aswered youre post yet, i gave it a try.


regards

Eric
 

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I wouldn't know about soldering the connections, but with Sport track if your using the Scalextric powerbase which has the ability to supply individual power to each lane by using 2 mains adaptors you shouldn't have any problems with a drop in power.

I have a pretty large 4 lane circuit in my loft, made from Scaley sport and I have no problems with power as I use the Sport powerbase with an individual power supply for each lane, so no need for booster cables.

But, I have heard that if you want real power, you would have to switch to a bespoke type of supply.

Cheers

Mark
 

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Personally I would not solder the track rail sections together - they need to be able to creep for thermal expansion...same as 1:1 railway tracks.
I would lightly smear the connectors with a conductive paste or gel before assembly, to aid continuity and prevent corrosion. I use ordinary Vasaline.
Cheers, Isetta.
 

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I would have imagined vaseline was an insuklator - but what do I know!?!

I had pondered WD40 for the use on connectors, since it displaces moisture and aids conductivity, but havent tried it for a permanent set-up in the connectors.

At first on a SF tip I cleaned the rails with WD40. Then I saw another tip saying NOT to use WD40 to clean the rails - because it made the rails get dirtier much quicker (dust and dirt sticks and collects on the rails much quicker). This was what I was finding - so I am not sure if it would be good inside the connectors or not.

by the way - also check out the debates on pinning the track down and issues of track expansion due to heat
 

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Is it wise, thinking of an intended rebuild of the portable and therefore bumped around Oxford track, to flip the sections over and solder connecting wires between them all before nailing 'em home?

Always assuming you are prepared to take the enormous time that would need for a six laner?

Has anyone experience of doing this on a small or grand scale?

Would you say don't bother?

Jonny, is Phoenix soldered or wired?

Folks at Eascote (Where is GJB??). How's yours done?

Answers on a postcard to....

Nah, leave you pearls of wisdom here, pretty please.
 

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Jim Moyes
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When Farnham was Plexy we found we had to do it (solder wires from piece to piece-that is), but we only did the bends for some reason. Passage of time makes the memory hazy-but I think after doing it we received one of those building society windfalls and collectively decided to invest in a completely new Ninco circuit. Problem solved!!

Mr.M
 

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So you didn't 'wire up' the Ninco? Is your set up permanent?

Sorry so many questions, I don't think it exactly a thread hijack, but we maybe, possibly, perhaps, don't ask us to commit, rebuilding sometime soon.
 

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Jim Moyes
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No, just laid it out and started racing, and more than 2 years later we still are! It is permanently set up but not fixed to the boards.
 

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Brian Ferguson
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On my last HO track (50 foot, 4 lane), I soldered jumpers to the underside on almost every piece. Obviously I couldn't flip the whole track back over in one piece so there were a few non-jumpered connections. Yes, it eliminated any concern over bad joints and aided in preventing power losses, but would I do it again? No.


My brother-in-law (mistyped that as bother-in-law
) used Vaseline on every connection on his track. A very light smear is all it takes - light enough that you really don't see it. What it does is prevent oxidation from forming in the contact area which can result in a high-resistance connection or even total lack of electrical continuity. Vaseline itself is neither a good conductor nor insulator, but when used as a very light smear, the contact pressure is enough to ensure good electrical continuity.

There are some greases which are conductive, but they are extremely expensive.

FWIW.
 
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