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DT
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Scalextric is to sponsor 250cc British rider Chaz Davies for the 2004 Moto GP season.





Chaz says: "The company Scalextric will now be sponsoring me in 2004. They are getting involved with two-wheel motorsport as they are making a Scalextric MotoGP set which will be on sale very soon. Neil Hodgson and I attended a London toy fair in January and we were testing a prototype of the MotoGP game. It is really good fun and I can't believe they haven't made one sooner!"

"I am really happy that Scalextric have come 'on board' as it is great to see a well known British company getting involved in motorcycling - and more importantly showing faith in me!"

Check out his site
 

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Jim Moyes
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Damn camera trickery!!

That bike is at a very unrealistic angle to be cornering!

I know coz I was at the Toyfair the young man mentioned!

QUOTE It is really good fun and I can't believe they haven't made one sooner!"

I suspect that last word may have been changed from lean!

And I think he may have misinterpreted all the laughing as fun!
 

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Jamie Coles
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Mr M - I don't think it is camera trickery - the bike isn't moving but is just lent over and to protect the young man's knee he has a little white kneeling cushion between his leg and the ground!
Jamie

 

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Are they also going to produce the mechanics in the same scale?
I particularly look forward to the mechanic in the "picking his spot off of his chin" pose!
 

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As long as Chaz continues to lean a lot further than the sponsor's own motorcycles, he sould be quite competitive!



Mark.
 

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Didn't Hailwood ride more upright and still win? Maybe Scaley could make a classic bike with Hailwood on it?

Dan
 

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Hi Dan,
Mike-the-Bike was leaning nearly as much as modern drivers, but with tires that were HORRID. More than 45-degree lean angle generally threw the bike and the driver. This only changed in the late 1980's when decent racing tires at last allowed a lean angle greater than provided by fairing clearance.

Let me tell you something: Valentino or Max have NOTHING over Mike, Jim Redman, Bill Ivy or Hugh Anderson.
Regards,

Dr. Pea (who competed in the same races and on the same Dunlop "Triangular" rock-hard tires...)

 

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Hailwood surely did win a lot of races, but then I suspect the reason why everyone used to ride so upright is because of the tyres (lack of grip, relatively speaking), the crappy chassis (possibly too much flex, and also old school suspensions possibly give poor feed back). In modern day, most of these problems have been reduced/rectified. Modern motorcycles aren't as soggy as they use to be. Especially at the time when there's too much power for the tyres to handle. Generally speaking, modern bikes would give more than enough feed back to the rider on most situation, providing the suspensions are set up correctly and tyres in good nick. There would be more confidence for the rider since there is more feed back, so that he/she would feel like he/she is in control.

I reckon one of the biggest/most important leap in bike development is tyres. Tyre technology has moved on big time, especially in the past 10 years, at least for road tyres anyway.

It is pretty hard to find a crap tyre these days, even going back a few years time when I got my knee down at the local roundabouts, then I was using BT50s/Maccadam. The amount of grip at lean was surprisingly good. Later on came BT56s/Michelin Pilots - great for tipping into a corner quickly and BT-010/020 are just amazing in the wet (though still brilliant in the dry)

Ooooops, drifted off-track. Just had a de-ja-vu from the old days when I was on a bike forum. Oh well..... By the way, the amount of lean a rider could achieve these days are contributed to modern technology, but also the style of riding has evolved. When motorbike racers dragging their knees down on the tarmac, they sometimes give an impression of a massive lean. However, this could be deceiving because of the rider hanging off the bike while cornering. This would make less lean of the bike but would travel at the same speed as a rider that is riding upright with more lean. This in turn gives the former more contact patch on the tyres and hence more grip during the corner. So the bike would be less likely to wash out/high side and the exit speed would be greater since the rider could get on the gas earlier.

Sorry guys if I bored you with this S**t, just got carried away!!

I too would love to see Scaley making some older bikes!
 

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this is just a pointless discussion u cannot compare the likes of mike hailwood agostini etc to the likes of rossi and biaggi they are from completley different era's they were the best riders of their time and the likes of rossi who is the best at the present bar none to leave the might of honda the most powerfull motorcycle in the world and join yamaha which has not won a 500gp race in two years jump on it and whup mighty honda
is totally awesome and unpresedented not forgetting he is only 25 oh and by the way he jumped in a ferrari in the week and was apparently lapping faster than the official test driver!


sorry got carried away there!
 

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QUOTE and by the way he jumped in a ferrari in the week and was apparently lapping faster than the official test driver!

This was a bit exagerated by the over-hyper Italian press. In fact Valentino was about 3 seconds off Luca's time. It is still exceptional as it was his first time in a F1, and let me tell you that if any of you has ANY illusions that you can jump in a F1 car and lap even 10 seconds off the pace, better lose them now.
Regards,

Dr. Pea
 

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i am under no illusions
i wonder what sort of time schummi would do on a 500gp bike or even if he would comlete one ?
 

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I'd be happy if I didn't stall the F1, managed to keep it on the track and return with my underwear unsoiled
regardless of how slow I was. I'd like to use full rpm for a couple of gears anyway!


IMHO the older motorcycle racers (the ones who are still around, anyway!) would possibly be more than capable of staying on the pace because the modern bike's abilities are far greater.

We can only hope that Mr. Davies does well and the coverage which he may receive might enable Scalextric to develop a system where the bikes do lean into the corners



Mark.
 

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QUOTE i am under no illusions i wonder what sort of time schummi would do on a 500gp bike or even if he would comlete one ?

Probably a lot better than many experienced bike riders... Remember that MS is possibly the fastest go-kart driver on the planet as proved time after time in demos, and has shown to be able to drive about anything on wheels. I think that he may not be ABLE to do it because of contracts.

As far as F1 and the tremendous effort and experience it takes to even drive a F1 car:
For a brief time in 1900/1992, I owned one of the 1988 Larrousse-Lolas (Dalmas and Alliot) with the 3.5-liter, 660HP Ford DFZ. I bought this car directly from Gerard Larrousse as they had switched to the Lamborghini engine in 1989. I received the car in superb and race-ready condition, Elkron liveried, in early 1990, and we went straight to Willow Springs for testing. I had two sets of tires, one a softer compound. We fitted this to the car first as I wanted to make sure that I would not "get caught" in a difficult and possibly dangerous situation. The week before, I increased my physical training by spending 3 hours a day in the local gym, lifting weights, doing push-ups and generally speaking, warming up my body to the task of 3G-plus life.
The DFZ engine is a sweetheart but as the 450HP 3-liter DFV found in older F1's, is somewhat peaky, so ANY torque only comes pretty high in the revs, like 8500 or so JUST to get it MOVING. It's a pretty delicate situation as one is virtually forced to spin the wheels in first gear just to get it going. Be sure that you point the steering in the right direction, LOTS of "heroes" got caught and had to change underwear on the spot.
The first thing we did is to go on the skid pad and feel the balance, and slightly alter the suspension adjustment to create very mild under-steer ( for the sake of safety).
Onto the big track. I am no F1 driver but I have a pretty solid middle-of-the-road racing career on bikes and cars, with lots of experience driving a large number of very high-power cars and keeping them on the pavement at pretty reasonable speed. I also know that there is ZERO relation between driving the fastest road cars on road tires and driving a true, high-power racing car weighing 1/4 or less of the road car's mass. Most people have no clue...and lots of delusions.
But this thing was something else: it flew at an alarming rate, with tremendous, Pro Stock-like acceleration, and required extremely quick decisions and incredible concentration or you would be off before you even know it. The lap record at Willow is held by Michael Andretti in a CART car at 1.06 something, with Nigel in a Lotus F1 a few hundreds behind.
After a DAY of testing on a track I know intimately since 1973, with a much better car than either the Lotus or Michael's Lola-Chevy (Ilmor), I turned the fastest lap I ever did there with any car, 1.17". I was wiped out from physical and mental exhaustion and could only do stints of 10 laps at a time before serious re-hydration in the form of energy drinks.
My mechanic, a SCCA veteran and a F/Atlantic regular driver, managed 1.21" and nearly passed out from exhaustion.
Now a current F1, even the 6-seconds-off-the-pace Minardi, would run CIRCLES around my 1988 Lola.
After this experience, driving my usual 1964 Brabahm sports-racer is like tiptoeing through the tulips. Let me tell you: top-level drivers ARE of a different breed, but experience and track time is absolutely what makes the difference, not big cojones. If you look at all the top guys, they have a lot of previous racing background, and lots of motivation. There is no such thing as a "natural" today, because the "naturals" die quickly.
One interesting fact: after I sold the car to a fellow In Connecticut, he went to Lime Rock to test the car. One of his buddies is a local hot-shot competing regularly in SCCA races in a B-prod Corvette and is running in the Speed channel series. It took him exactly ONE lap to loose the car big time and nearly wipe it out. He got caught on the engine's peakiness and never had a chance. Lead-foot drivers with no brain matter no need apply.

As far as the Scalextric bikes, it is sad indeed that they could not figure out a way to make them lean in the corners, and it is not THAT complicated either. I am sorry that they did not try very hard, but I am not about showing them how to do it since I may have a bit of a project going at this time.
Regards,

Dr. Pea
Now WAY too old to take 3G's for breakfast.
 

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Russell Sheldon
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Now this is leaning...



...and sure, Schumi can ride a bike...



Kind regards

Russell
 
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