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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

As a solution for Scaley track conductivity, I found a new solution though I haven't tested it yet on very long track sections. I'm sure I'm not the first one to have tried this technique, but anyway, here's how I did.

The principle is simple.

Buy some 3/64 inch width flat copper braid :


Cut it in chuncks of 3 centimeters. Insert them between the pastic track and the metal rail at each track connection :


It should look like this :


Cheers,
Bernard
 

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Greg Gaub
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That's very similar to what I read someone did with old braids and solder wick.
I'm interested in finding out how well it performs for longer tracks. I'm also interested in hearing if there's an increase in problems with cars' guides getting wedged in the join. Scalextric rails are already quite close together, and some guides get stuck when a join has a narrow slot. I would expect this to increase that tendency.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
QUOTE (MrFlippant @ 2 Dec 2011, 20:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That's very similar to what I read someone did with old braids and solder wick.
I'm interested in finding out how well it performs for longer tracks. I'm also interested in hearing if there's an increase in problems with cars' guides getting wedged in the join. Scalextric rails are already quite close together, and some guides get stuck when a join has a narrow slot. I would expect this to increase that tendency.

The braid is just a bit thicker than the "natural" hole between the rail and the plastic part of the track. So it's true that rails get a bit closer but it's so imperceptible that I don't think you'll have more problems than you currently have with normal guides (by "normal", I meant non-Carrera).

About solder wick: I didnd't go this way by purpose. Solder wick commonly contains resin coat which I'm afraid is not optimal for conductivity...

Bernard
 

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Greg Gaub
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I agree that solder wick is a bad choice. Where did you get this copper braid? I assume at some kind of builder's supply store, but what grouping of products would this likely be found in? Electrical? Plumbing? In a spool like that, what is its usual purpose?
 

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Mark
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b much easier than soldering sections and crimping rails together. easier to live with if u decide to change your track layout too! like the idea, its simple!!!! has it been tested on a lenghty track?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (MrFlippant @ 2 Dec 2011, 23:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I agree that solder wick is a bad choice. Where did you get this copper braid? I assume at some kind of builder's supply store, but what grouping of products would this likely be found in? Electrical? Plumbing? In a spool like that, what is its usual purpose?

I bought it from Minute Man Electronics. Don't ask me what's the usual purpose of this product, I just googled it, found it and bought it

Cheers,
Bernard
 

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Why use something as thick as this good old fashioned bell wire will do the samething as I have pointed out on many occassons and does not close the slot together, if it does then in good old England we have a Pound coin that fits in the slot and will seperate the slot almost to its original width, I would also increase the lenght of the wire used for the jumper.
This has been tried and tested on many club tracks and works.
Zen
 

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solid wire single core used to wire the bell for your house normally sold as twocore on a reel. Some garden centres supply tying wire once the coating has been stripped of then the single core wire can also be used cut 3 inch strips and push this down between the rails as per the first post

Zen
 
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