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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello All,
Back again with another "Rough-storation" I thought I would share with you here, especially after being most encouraged by the comments received on the first one I documented and shared (a big thanks to everyone who did). The link is here for anyone interested ( SCALEXTRIC JPS Lotus 77 C126 ).

Anyhow, the reason for choosing this model next, the Scalextric Tyrrell Ford 007, out of an ever-growing stash of cars needing some care and attention, was the recent Ytube videos watched from the 70's era F1 and in particular Jody Scheckter driving the Tyrrell Ford 007 No. 3.
Some of the vidoes available showing F1 races from this time are amazing to see, as the quality in some cases far exceeds the sometimes blurry, fuzzy reception on the televisual box shown at the time, especially those shown live. Thanks to those posting them to Ytubes so we are all able to rewatch them again.


This thread will not show every step, as the "Rough-storation" on the Lotus 77 linked above showed every step in detail, and as I usually follow the same process each time, I would only be repeating myself.

Here we go (again).

Part 1:

In the as received condition and looking rather sorry for itself.
Top-side.
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Toy Vehicle


Bottom-side
Toy Machine Auto part Gas Wood


After an external inspection, I noted the roll hoop above the drivers head was broken but still there, and more than likely the same for the lugs on the airbox/rear wing which is all one moulding, based upon the blue-tak smushed under the airbox section, holding it in place.
This would need dealing with later, but first, disassembly.
Circuit component Gas Engineering Machine Auto part

A rather secure front end on this model with the upper body containing a tongue which slides under and into a small retaining housing in the chassis floor/front wing section, negating the need for an extra screw usually found to hold these two together. Nice.

Front and rear axle assemblies removed next and then the motor, which is fixed to the chassis interestingly, by means of two motor mount adaptors front and rear. Some care was needed when prying these away from the chassis so as not to break the fixing lugs on the mounts, or retaining lugs on the chassis which would render the mounts useless and motor relocation rather difficult.
Toy Tire Motor vehicle Wood Wheel

As can be seen, everything came apart with ease and no breakages, which is always a bonus. Afterall the intention is to restore not damage further, if one can help it!
Due to the amount of muck and grime both internal and external on all parts, the next stage is the obligatory bath and soak in warm soapy water. The motor and mounts will be inspected and cleaned seperately if necessary.

After soaking and a light brushing of all parts with a very soft toothbrush, chassis, upper body, airbox/rear wing and engine moulding in one container, tyres, wheels, rear bearings/bushings and axles in another jar, parts were towel dried and set out to dry thoroughly.
I have to say, with the muck and grime now removed, all parts seem to be in great condition with no major scratches or scuffs, and this is before any attempt at polishing.
Motor vehicle Toy Font Toy block Auto part

As can be seen at the top part of this photo, the retaining lugs for the Airbox/rear wing, or at least one of them is still stuck in the right hand side of the engine moulding (when viewed from rear). This will need to be removed and reattached to the Airbox/rear wing and another lug made and attached to the left side. Two lugs were originally fitted to attach the airbox/rear wing to the top of the engine, but are currently detached. I will not be reusing the blue-tak it came with for obvious reasons.

Part 2 to follow.

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Having now reclaimed several dozen old Scalextric cars, I've found that it's amazing how much better a simple cleaning makes most of them look, and go. Stuff that looks like bin-fodder can be quite decent under 40+ years of grime.

My own gauge for whether to open up a Johnson motor is whether, after a couple of goes in the ultrasonic bath, there is any end float on the armature. If there is, all good, and I'll simply lube and run for a few minutes in each direction. Most of the Johnsons I've encountered have run well after this. If there's no float, it means there's a hair and carpet fluff thrust washer in there, usually at the commutator end, so it's time to lever up the tags and take the end off. Don't forget to file off the pinion splines a bit so the shaft will go through the endbell bearing without damaging it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the advice on the motor cleaning/servicing @PatB, and the tip on pinion spline clearance.

With these open cans, a degree of dust and fluff is likely to have been drawn into most motors over time, so I think I will open this one up for inspection at least, based upon the amount of dust on the rest of the model surfaces.
 

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You will be surprised also , how much grime, oil and grease those Johnson motors can pick up over many years . Most of us either grease or oil our rear axles /bearings , and the motor bushes. So being can motors with quite large air intakes ....the Johnson motors can gunk up . What I do with older motors ( to try and avoid pulling them apart) , is to submerge the entire motor in Shellite fluid ( available at most hardware stores) and run them at around 3volts for around 3 minutes (low revs ) .....and watch the gunk that floats out . Then of course , re-oil the bearings/ bushes . It's safe and very effective . If after this treatment the motor is still not working as it should , then it's time for some surgery .
Zig
 

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I know some people disparage the Johnson 111 as being a poor motor. However, I've come to rather like them. They fulfil their design brief (a cheap, reliable unit to power motorised toys) perfectly. Of the many that have now passed through my hands, I think I've had one that didn't run with power applied. It looked like it had spent 20 years at the bottom of a pond, and the brush springs had dissolved. The rest of it cleaned up fine. Even an example with one of its brushes held in with blu-tac spun up when asked. Not well, but it ran. I'm also yet to find one with worn out brushes. I don't know what they're made of, but they just seem to last forever.

So, no, it's not a "serious" motor, but in good nick it'll spin happily off-load at 20k+ rpm* forever. It provides ample power to spang any of the cars it was fitted to off the skirting board at a squillion miles per hour. There are still thousands of them out there, making them cheap and plentiful enough that you can do some selective assembly to get a really good one. Until you start playing with commutator timing and hot winds (when, presumably, you'll run into the limitations that those who've done so talk about), it does its job. In the rare event that it doesn't, that box of junk under the swap meet table/on an auction site, for 99p, almost certainly contains a couple of examples that will.

What's not to like?

*based on comparison with a tone generator on my phone, rather than a proper tacho, which I don't have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Part 2:

On close inspection of the motor, no overhaul or stripdown appeared necessary as the motor felt free. Only a minor external clean to remove a few pieces of fluff visible around the brush retaining springs was undertaken. Light oiling and run-up on a 9v battery and the motor was on song and virtually silent during the short run.

The minor repairs needed to correct the fixing lugs for the airbox/rear wing caused a slight delay as nothing suitable was available in my materials stash.
After doing a little housekeeping in the work area accompanied by numerous mugs of tea, essential when carrying out such mundain tasks, I happened upon a couple of possibilities, one being a milk carton screw cap and a more promising option, an old Scalextric crystal case originally for a Ford RS 200, but received as packaging for another fleabay purchase some time ago. This had a suitable base in blue with support ribs on the underside which looked to be around the same thickness as the airbox/rear wing support/fixing lugs.

A small section was cut from both options but the flatter piece proved to be more suitable.

The original broken lug piece retrieved from the engine was cleaned and glued in place along with the trimmed piece cut approximately to shape from the crystal case base rib.
Blue Electric blue Plastic Font Fashion accessory



A little bit of sanding and trimming later and the airbox/rear wing now has two lugs to secure it in place again on top of the plastic engine.
Toy Electric blue Plastic Fashion accessory Event



The initial fit was a little tight and the darker coloured lug (nearest camera above) came adrift so was trimmed a little more and reglued in place.
Drying time was extended also to ensure glue had fully cured before final fitment and polish all over to bring up a perfect shine.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Car



One final press home to fully seat the airbox/rear wing and it seats firmly but also squarely which adds to the pleasing end result.
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire



Aside from a few wraps of PTFE tape around both rear axle bushings to eliminate some play in the axle (similar to Scalextric JPS Lotus 77 - see that thread for details), and a light oiling of all tyres, nothing else was needed other than to take to the track.

All fuelled up and ready to go (with another mug of tea!).
Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire Wheel


Another few hours enjoyment (for less than a few £'s) bringing one of these classics back to life.
But even better, multiple hours and laps ahead of it for the foreseeable future so let the fun begin.

End.
(Until the next one!)

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Very impressive repair to the air box lugs. I’m afraid I’ve resorted just to glueing the parts in place when I’ve done similar repairs. I must try harder!
Mike
Many thanks for your comment Mike.
Nothing wrong at all in your chosen method of repair, as it may prove stronger in the long run albeit a little more permanent.

I was fortunate in having one original lug available, even though broken (lug furthest from camera in shot below), to model the other from which did make this easier for me.
Due to the weakness in this area as can be seen on closer inspection, there is a stepped/change of section, right at the point the lug protrudes from the engine surface/airbox seating surface, producing a shear effect at this point should any kind of lateral force be applied to the rear wing.
This is the likely reason why the lugs broke at this point.
Toy Electric blue Plastic Fashion accessory Event


I know, if you're not crashing you're not trying, right? (I forget where I heard that statement before).

I had originally thought of carrying out the lug repair using a slightly stronger method involving two pins per lug extending into the wing moulding section as well as the lugs, with the addition of some glue, but this was deferred as it is a little more involved and this current repair may well be sufficient.
Also, if that repair method proves to be too strong, a breakage may occur elsewhere resulting in more extreme damage. Only time will tell.

The pins in question are some fine drills I obtained during the clearout of a toolroom of an old injection moulding company and I thought they would come in handy someday, as well as being useful for drilling rather small holes!

You can compare the drill size next to a One pound coin (GBP) and be very careful not to drop any on the carpet.
Wood Cutlery Font Circle Metal


Hopefully the first repair method will suffice, but these will be useful as a backup.

Cheers,
Martin

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