SlotForum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are some excellent ideas on the louvre thread which got me thinking about something else..

when scribing/cutting new shut lines or rescribing existing shutlines which tools do you use. I generally use a card template of the desired line stuck to the body and then trace the line with a scalpel. I suspect there are easier ways, how do you guys do it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts


These are the tools I use for scribing panel lines and similar.
Two of them are from the dentists´ supply shop, the other ones selfmade.
The "real razor blade" saws are excellen because they don´t waste much material when cutting something with them.
The tiny scribers and blades are made of electric welding wires from Wolfram (very hard), shaped with a Dremel and cutting disc. The one with the hook is the most efficient scriber because it takes off a tiny "hair" of plastic and leaves a rectangular gap/line.

Schackel
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,780 Posts
What a wonderful set of tools you have there Schackel


QUOTE (Schackel @ 11 Oct 2004, 11:31)The one with the hook is the most efficient scriber because it takes off a tiny "hair" of plastic and leaves a rectangular gap/line.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

The square bottomed line is what I'm after which I can't achieve with a scalpel or scriber.

Many thanks for posting the pics and the info
.

I'm off to grind my own scriber now
.

Thanks,
MAF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,593 Posts
I use a very small woodworking gouge called a 'veiner'. It's V-shaped and cuts a very fine shaving out of resin or plastic- when it's sharp. It leaves a V-shaped cut, not a flat-bottomed one of course, but that hadn't bothered me until you pointed it out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
QUOTE (howmet tx @ 11 Oct 2004, 15:57)I use a very small woodworking gouge called a 'veiner'. It's V-shaped and cuts a very fine shaving out of resin or plastic- when it's sharp. It leaves a V-shaped cut, not a flat-bottomed one of course, but that hadn't bothered me until you pointed it out!
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, howmet, as you see I also have two v- shaped scribers among the others.
It depends much on the material which scriber I use. The rectangular one works best with Styrene and similar softer plastic. The v - shaped ones are used with fiberglass bodies for example because their surface very often is harder and the line edges might tend to split if scribed with the rectangular tool. With the v - shaped I can start with a tiny thin cut and enlarge it if possible or necessary.

schackel
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top