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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having been a member of this forum for nearly a year I've read many posts and visited recommended web sites etc. but have always found an excuse not to create a complete resin body. Circumstances have finally caught up with me and I have just finished my first one. Rather than say what I did this is a catalogue of what went wrong.

It all started when the car I'd waited for most of the year was released. To my great disappointment it wasn't the version I wanted. I then found a 1/32 diecast model of this car and having a Ninco chassis with the right scale wheelbase I was expecting to fit one to the other.
Either the car or the chassis wasn't to scale as the car was 4mm short in the wheelbase. I stripped the car to its component pieces and then cut in half on the sills. Pieces of plastic sheet were used to fill the gap and provide reinforcement to the join to extend it the missing 4mm. The doors were refitted towards the back of the car and the resulting gap towards the front filled with card and filler. When dry a new line for the door was scribed into the filler extending the door 2mm. Some other minor modifications were made to the body, the cockpit was built and then the diecast was ready for fitting.

At this time I realised that my casting materials had reached the end of their 6 months shelf life. I'd made a few parts but there was still too much left to waste so I decided to bite the bullet and use this car as a first. Now the problems really began.

Mounted on plastersine and surrounded by Lego I mixed and poured the silicon rubber over. Not only did some of the mixture manage to find gaps in the brick but two days later the rubber still hadn't set. Not enough hardener, I poured more on top and mixed with a screwdriver. Next day it was set.

I have never used a release agent on the small items I have moulded in the past and all have just come away clean but this time although the car was not a problem the plastersine stuck firmly to the rubber and I couldn't scrape it off. Little bits still keep falling off every time I touch the mould but luckily none of this has spoilt any of the castings.

I felt the side walls were too thin so I fitted the mould back into the Lego wall before making my first two castings. It was only because the second cast had a perfect finish that I realised that in doing this mould was slightly compressed and the casting was distorted. Also when fixing to the plastersine I hadn't marked the wheel arches out fully so when sloshing the resin around it escaped from the mould - very messy.

The third casting the mould was placed on a flat piece of wood and not touched at all. This turned out as perfect as I could have hoped for and is the one I used for the model.

After cleaning up, fitting mounting posts, washing with soapy warm water the body was sprayed silver, followed by the cockpit details. Decal instruments finished the interior. I built the driver from various resin castings, including the steering wheel, and added details with green stuff.

I don't know why but for some reason I made separate castings of the petrol cap and engine grills rather than have them cast in with the body. I think I thought it would be easier to cover them 'bare metal foil' if they were separate. The grills worked but not the petrol cap which came apart while gluing to the body causing a mess over the bonnet. The bonnet had to be rubbed down, masked and resprayed. I then decided to use the donor cars parts which glued with out further mishap.

I drew the decals on the computer at twice full size and printed at 50% which gave a much better finish than my earlier attempts. The printer has a better dots per inch than the computer programme so they don't end up quite so pixelated. I didn't fix the ink properly though as some of it came off while fixing. I always make extras so I sprayed the remained again and stuck over the originals. They looked OK until I sprayed a clear coat over the finished car - now they reflect light differently to the rest of the body and are quite obvious from some angles. The red stripes were made by spraying a spare piece of decal paper red and then cutting the required shape out.

I used the donor car's windscreen but for some reason the clear coat turned it cloudy, something that has never happened before. It must have been the plastic it was made of. I had to remove it and created a replacement out of clear plastic sheet. I held this against the original with elastic bands and dipped in boiling water to make it take its shape.

So what I thought would be an afternoons job eventually took three weeks, and I haven't mentioned the fact that I placed the finished car body on a pool of spilt super glue.

I've learnt a lot during this time, mainly to be more careful and read and follow instructions, and hope some of this will help if you plan to try yourself. I know I am going to have another go as I have a Pendle PCS32 chassis waiting for my next creation - It'll be a proper sports car.

Click here for further pictures and details

 

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Fast Co.
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1,240 Posts
Wow JAK - what a story. I really appreciate the in-depth drama. Never having scratchbuilt a slot car before, I've gained a new appreciation for what can go wrong. I've been having all sorts of frustrations just landscaping my layout. But I do have a few dozen 1/32 scale models and resin kits that I plan to one day scratchbuild.

Learning what can go wrong is much more worthwhile than seeing something done without a hitch. I think I've gained some valuable lessons from your expreriences.

BTW, the car looks to have been well worth the effort. I love that cockipt detail!

Best regards,
Steve
 

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Rob
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3,430 Posts
Despite the mishaps you've created a great looking model that I'm sure you're proud of.
Congratulations for sticking at it when I'm sure many people would have given up. And thaks for the education too!

Rob


PS How many of us would have just posted the pic and said look what I did, instead of being as honest as JAK?!!
 

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Premium Member
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4,213 Posts
Jak

Way too harsh on your self - end results look great great ammount of effort!

One question - your figures - where, who, how much. I assume you make them your self - how?

Great article - looking forward to seeing your enttry in the Pendle chassis build competition!

Gareth
 

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Premium Member
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1,342 Posts
very nice job!!! That looks like a car you will be proud of for years to come. In my own experience there's always a story behind any car you build yourself. It's not the unforeseen challenges that matter so much as the process of resolving them. I enjoyed your story!
best regards,
John
 

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284 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi

Thanks for your comments about the car, it does feel quite an achievement to have finally completed it.

The driver is a mixture of resin castings. The head is part of a silicon mould with some other car parts. Because of the shape it suffers with air bubbles a lot, particularly one that forms in the nose so I have a few rejects. This was one but with having to sculpt the shades there was enough support to remodel the nose as well. The body is from the Chassis donor Ninco VW, as was the steering wheel and these were just pushed into plastersine and resin casts made. Once stuck together the jacket, vest, hair, shades and nose were sculpted in green stuff, which is a bit like milliput but easier to make fine details although more expensive.

I'll have to give the Pendle competition a little thought. At present the base of my next creation is sitting in a pool of nail varnish remover. It was badly painted static which I hope I can salvage as most of the parts are there.
 
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