SlotForum banner
61 - 80 of 143 Posts

·
Al Schwartz
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
I was traveling to England frequently on business over 50 years ago and all of the above pales in comparison to dealing with the pre-decimalization currency. I became fairly adept at working with pounds, shillings and pence and could even deal with the bill at my preferred hotel, the Compleat Angler in Marlow, which was presented in gns!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,444 Posts
....and could even deal with the bill at my preferred hotel, the Compleat Angler in Marlow, which was presented in gns!
Of course, a 'Gentlemen's currency' don't you know? :)

My Aunt and Uncle lived across the River from the Compleat Angler, a nice stroll to go for lunch, or afternoon tea. (y)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,558 Posts
I'm sure I've used him before but listening to Harry take apart the so-called design of the Integra Type R had me rejoicing in my old-fart-dom.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,658 Posts
Of course, a 'Gentlemen's currency' don't you know? :)

My Aunt and Uncle lived across the River from the Compleat Angler, a nice stroll to go for lunch, or afternoon tea. (y)
Your answer made look on the web for more info... Interesting it was pounds for everything else and Guineas for profesionals services(hence the "Gentlemen" currency).

The same way lawyers used to write "esq" after their names, meaning for "esquire" not just some ordinary peasant. In Spain and México in the days of the Colonies, lawyers also used by royal decrete the name "illustrious" before the title (advocate/lawyer) meaning also something higher in class that the common folk, nowdays only one bar remains using that name for its college members.

Glad to learn something new from another culture mates.

Cheers
 

·
Al Schwartz
Joined
·
3,392 Posts
A Compleat Angler story: On my first visit my small party (3) was treated with clearly evident disdain by the restaurant staff (of primarily eastern Mediterranean origin I believe) After two nights of this, I was ready for it to stop. When the headwaiter dropped the wine list on the table, I waved it off, saying:
"Bring us a bottle of Chateau Carbonnieux blanc (a little known but highly rated white Bordeaux)
Response: "There is no such wine"
Me: "Do you have a book of wines?"
Response "Of course"
Me: "Please bring it to me"
The reading of the entry describing the wine was followed by a flustered apology and a promise to have it available the next day. Service for the rest of our stay was excellent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,444 Posts
Magic stuff! :)

Nothing quite so confuses the staff as when you know more about their job than they do!


My niece had her wedding breakfast at the Angler, and as it was the middle of a good summer (remember them?) all the women guests carried parasols, ALL the same, in white with black trim. I'd imported them from Berlin some weeks before, where I got a good deal for bulk purchase. ;)

That totally amazed the Angler's staff, who kept on coming round to our group to gawp. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,120 Posts
Discussion Starter · #67 ·
GDS

In Britain today the courtesy title, Esquire, is only used when addressing an envelope to a chum who might be regarded as an equal. 'Twas a matter of course until recent times, and usually abbreviated to Esq, or Esq.re, but things have changed.

It's a quaint paradox that these 'niceties' have been dropped, yet the feudal system handed down by the Romans, when they left in the mid Sixth Century (they couldn't stand the weather, either), remains as strong and divisive as ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
I have vague memories of a pub, well more of a bar, on the Thames where one would park near the bridge and phone ( call box as no mobiles in those days) the owner would come in a boat and transport us to the bar. Could only get back the same way. There was no public access otherwise.
As I said vague. Which puts it in the "old age" thread.

Ah Guineas. The extra 5% is usually the auctioneer's commission.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I have vague memories of a pub, well more of a bar, on the Thames where one would park near the bridge and phone ( call box as no mobiles in those days) the owner would come in a boat and transport us to the bar. Could only get back the same way. There was no public access otherwise.
As I said vague. Which puts it in the "old age" thread.

Ah Guineas. The extra 5% is usually the auctioneer's commission.
Ravens Ait Kingston ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
I think I've only ever been called Esquire once, I bought a Humber keyring from I'm guessing an older Gent and he used it on the envelope (and I suppose Humber in esence is a mark of age too, they haven't made a Car since '76).
That bar sounds awesome but I'm guessing is gone or atleast doesn't have that level of peace anymore.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
I always understood that esquire was used when the sender of the letter did not know the correct title status to use for the recipient, e.g. Mr., Dr., Hon., Prof., Sir etc. It is indeed an old and little used term now as such niceties of respect have been jettisoned.

On the plus side, we now have the term Ms. used regularly, which is a similar concept for females.
 

·
Electric model car driver
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
My wife and I received an envelope in the mail today from our power company addressed to B**m and D*****y E******n. No Mr Mrs anything, treating us like their buddies the rissoles. That kinda ticks me off a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Ravens Ait Kingston ?
After some digging, I think the Bounty at Cookham seems the most likely although back in the day I don't know if the foot/towpath got that far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
621 Posts
My wife and I received an envelope in the mail today from our power company addressed to B**m and D*****y E******n. No Mr Mrs anything, treating us like their buddies the rissoles. That kinda ticks me off a bit.
They seem to do that with everything of late, insist on calling me by first name when it's even a complaint, I was taught never ever to use a first name until the person says you can call me ...., otherwise it's just bad manners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Sign of old age?

You know what this is.

 
  • Like
Reactions: mickey thumbs

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,658 Posts
Sign of old age?

You know what this is.

A "thermo"? Recipient to keep water Hot after you boiled some at the stove, my mom used to put tea inside for when I got sick and skipped school...
 
61 - 80 of 143 Posts
Top