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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, I think I captured the nature of my progress in the title of this thread! I'm plodding along here, but wanted to share with you what I've been up to. Here are some pictures of the work to date on the underpass that allows team transport trucks to enter the paddock without driving across the track. This underpass is located just past the pit lane exit, near the end of the main straight on my track plan.











There will be two main components to the underpass. The first are the two retaining walls and road that will lead to the paddock. The road will be depressed under the track and will rise up to the level of the paddock. The walls are made up of segmented pieces of wood that will be detailed to look like cast in place concrete. They are segmented rather then curved because I want them to look authentic to what might have been built for a rural North American track in the 1950's - 1960's. Curved walls were certainly a possibility then, but would have cost more to make than segmented walls. This track and support buildings are to have been built by a retired farmer/current track owner. I imagine the farmer as wanting to make a nice facility, but being frugal and stubborn enough to build it himself! I 'll put wood batten strips over the segmented joints to simulate concrete buttresses. The horizontal concrete form lines will be burned into the wood with a woodbruner. The wood will then be painted and weathered to look like concrete.

The second component of the underpass is the bridge. It will be modeled to look like a concrete road (track) deck supported by steel girders and beams. The girders will span between two concrete walls. The railing of the bridge will look like cast in place concrete with metal railing components.

As you can see, I have a long way to go. I have most of the wood parts made. I will be building it in two modules that I can build and paint on my work table and then drop into place on the track table. The road base will be built into the retaining wall module. I will add the final road surface detailing to it after it is set in place. I'll post more pictures as things develop. Thanks for looking and please share any advice you may have. This is definately a first for me, I can use all of the help you can offer....

Brad
 

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Rob
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Brad, you don't have small ideas, do you?


It's a great idea and I can't wait to see the end result. I can just imagine a team truck coming through the underpass - it's going to be impressive. I'm enjoying the scenario you're building too - you really are having way too much fun with this, aren't you?


cheers,

Rob
 

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That looks really impressive Brad, i'm looking forward to pictures of your progress. What are the dimensions are of your track plan? I'm interested in how the concrete slabs turn out, did you think about bending a thin piece of wood against the slabs to give the wall a smooth finish?

Keep on doing your stuff (but faster i want to see more pics
)

Larry.
 

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The scope of and detail of your ideas is fantastic! It's always worth the wait to see the next development of your track! The first picture shows the difference between your approach and mine - the beautifully cared for set of chisels and hand tools, where-as I tend to use a power-saw and a big hammer!
 

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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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1,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys. You're kind and very patient!

Astro: Hand tools are one of my other hobbies/vices. During the week I'm usually working on the track into the wee hours of the morning so being quite is necessary to keep the troops happy. I do breakout the power tools and big hammer on the weekends!

Larry: I did contemplate making the walls curved but am opting for the segmented walls because I think they look less refined. If I were to make the walls curved, I would have started out just as I have and then added 1/8" or 3mm veneer plywood like they use to "skin" flush interior doors. It's smooth, flexible and comes in large sheets that would allow for a seamless installation. My track is built on an 8'-0" x 17'-0" table. The track itself is two lane Carrera track with both lanes measuring equally at just shy of 65' in length. Here's an overall picture of the track taken before it had been weathered.



SpaModeller: Thanks, your track and scenery skills can be set as goal for anyone to strive for. 'Spa' has been sharing pictures of some of his latest projects with me, and boy are they impressive!

Rob: My ideas start off small, I just don't have the discipline to keep them from growing out of hand
. Thankfully, I am having a ball with it. Now if I could just convince you to visit for a couple of weeks. With your ability to get things done I might actually make some real headway!

Thanks for the complements. They certainly provide a good source of motivation.

Brad
 

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Impressive is an understatement as always. I've probably missed it but can you share exactly what I'm seeing to keep the cars on the table as well as children and dogs off it? Is that plexiglass or...?

 

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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys.

DogFish: I've installed aluminum screen fabric around the perimeter of the table and fiberglass screen wire where most of the cookie cutter pieces rise from the main table top. Both of these arrangements are temporary. The fiberglass screen will eventually be replaced by scenery. The Aluminum screen will be removed and hopefully won't need any sort of replacement. I intend to "bowl" the scenery up on three sides of the table and keep it level on the side that is next to the main straight. This is an idea that I am borrowing from David Reinecke. The idea is that the rise in terrain of the scenery will prevent the cars from running off of the table when they leave the track. In the event that the scenery solution doesn't quite work, I will add glass at the perimeter of the table. Interestingly enough, I can get cut and polished glass from a local glazer for less money than cut plexiglass. The price comparison is based upon plexi that won't yellow with age. Eventually, my basement will be finished and the track will be a very visible part of it. I intend to trim out the fascia of the track with finished wood to match the wood trim in the surrounding room. I also plan to build display shelves into the base of the table for cars, race collectables and part of my Lionel train collection.

Thanks again for the complements.

Brad
 

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Brad... looking at your drawing, I have a question; are you an architect, a landscape architect, or a draftsman? I worked as a draftsman and architectural model builder for several years in my late teens and early 20's, and I'm guessing you are "one of the above."



Beautiful work, BTW... I especially like the segmented walls.
 

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Brad,

Looks great. I was going to do the same (not at that detail level), but FORGOT when I did the screening to make a place to do so. DOH! So, now I have the next project - cut one back in. It's been driving me nuts that the cars in the Paddock just "appear". Not realistic at well.

My latest work has been "restoring" some old Strombecker buildings and grandstands. I've got to weather the stands, and then I'll post some pics.
 

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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Swisher and David.

Swisher: Good guess, I'm an architect. I work mostly on residential projects. I drafted my track plan using AutoCAD, and here's the kicker...I lost the drawing file when my hard drive crashed! That would have never happened in the old days of drafting by hand. I'm in the process of redrawing that the track plan, and saving on a backup disk each time I work on it. Innitially, I drew the plan to have something to show my friends what the layout will look like when it is finished. I found that I refer to it often to when I'm working on the track.

David: I can't wait to see the pictures of the Strombecker structures. They'll fit in nicely to your layout. I just got 4 chassis and motor setups for you're Trans Am resin bodies. I'm going to take a shot at building them after I get the overpass finished. I'll be in touch to get some decals from you.

Brad
 

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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hi all: Here's the latest update on the underpass progress.

Retaining walls:
I've burned all of the concrete form lines in to the sidewall pieces and then joined them together with wood glue and nails (Astro: I used a pneumatic finish nailer!). I next applied wood batten strips that simulate the face of concrete buttresses between each segment of wall; followed by raised cap pieces at the tops of the buttresses. The back sides of the buttress caps are angled because 1:1 retaining wall buttresses would likely be angled from wide at the base to narrow at the top. I applied pieces to cap the wall segments between the buttresses. These pieces are purely cosmetic and will function as a curb to abut the terrain into.

Ramp:
The roadway from the paddock to the underpass is graded rather steep, more so than what one would be at a 1:1 track. This was a concession made to the limited available space. I really wanted to model an underpass like this, so I decided to go ahead and "shoehorn" it in. The base of the road is made of 3/32" birch veneer model airplane plywood and sanded tile grout. The plywood was a real chore to fit in and around all of the wall segments and buttresses. I ended up having a gap of +/- 1/8" between the walls and the plywood. I cut strips of the same plywood to glue over the gaps so that the grout would not fall through. The grout was applied over the plywood and was originally intended to be the finished surface. I was thinking that I would be able to apply it smoothly enough to simulate concrete, but I was wrong. The material was perfect, the application was not. The combination of a curving/twisting surface and bending/undulating sidewalls was too much for me to handle. The resulting surface was not smooth and flat enough to look like concrete. As such, I will cover the surface with N scale model railroad ballast to simulate a gravel road. I was already planning on using this for the area behind the pit building, so it won't look too out of place on the road down to the underpass.

Paint:
The bridge supports and the retaining walls have the first two coats of paint on them. I'm trying for a weathered (but not too old) concrete effect. The base coat is a basic gray primer color that looks like new concrete. The second coat is a camouflage beige color that looks like faded concrete. Both colors were applied from rattle cans. I will airbrush the final weathering. There will be a general "dusting" of color to reduce some of the contrast between the first two coats and rust and grime highlights from the bridge structure and railings that will be placed on the bridge and retaining walls.

Here are the pictures of how things look to date. The pieces are set in place and not yet anchored down. The fit between the bridge base and the retaining walls will improve - hopefully!









Next:
My next step is to build a storm water drain at the base of the road. After that, I will be working on the railings and fencing at the bridge and retaining walls. As always, please let me know what you think. I'd really appreciate any advice you can offer.

Thanks for looking.

Brad
 

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Brad Korando / Brad Korando
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks Bigford 550, TrojanUK and jmswms. I'm looking forward to the next steps of the underpass as I think that they will be a lot of fun to do.

TrojanUK: Here's a link to the threads that I posted about painting the track. Have a look and let me know if you have any questions. Paving at Priaire Ridge Road Course I'm very happy that I painted the track. I added the tire marks with an airbrush. Innitially, I was concerned that the finish might not be very durable, but it is proving to be very durable indeed. The process I chose to was time consuming, but well worth the effort.

Bill: I know you're in California, but if you ever make it to Chicago or Milwaukee let me know. I'm right between either city and and would greatly welcome a visit.

Brad
 

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Looking really good! What's happening at the end of the road though? It seems to end in a wall rather than a tunnel under the track? Is this a temporary thing, or does it have to stay?
 

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Rob
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I wonder how many times we're all going to say 'Wow, Brad' before you finish your track?


It looks very good though, love the detail on the walls and butresses. Like you say, the gradient is a little steep but I don't think it's a problem. In your scenario you can just imagine the owner thinking "shorter tunnel = less cost, how steep can we make the exit ramp?"!! I was surprised you said you weren't happy with the road surface, it looks fine in the pics.

cheers,

Rob
 
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