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Is there a good how-to on soldering on the forum? I have never been any good at soldering, but I suspect that it's always been down to the cheap equipment I've used.

How about recommendations for irons and solder suitable for successfully repairing slot cars?

TIA
 

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Thanks for the replies thus far.


When I said..........QUOTE (StuBeeDoo @ 27 Apr 2012, 20:32) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>recommendations for irons and solder suitable for successfully repairing slot cars?........ I should have been a bit more precise. What I meant was repairing the electrics;- fixing "dry joints", replacing blown LEDs, making connections in cables, wiring-in a new motor, that sort of thing. I'll never have the patience to scratch-build a chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks again everyone.


I'll get myself a Weller iron and some 60/40 rosin solder and start practicing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
QUOTE (stoner @ 30 Apr 2012, 16:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>as said before clean and clean again every thing to be soldered ,small dab of rosin flux on both surfaces then tin both pieces and apply a small amount of solder, when your fuseing the parts. on a brass and steel chassis youve got to get it very very clean, use an acid flux and silver solder for the main joints then acid flux and 60-40 solder for the smaller add on parts,like struts to the rear and front wheels, this has a lower melting point than siver solder so your less likely to to remelt the parts youve allready soldered. i tend to flux and tin all the parts to be soldered first, this gives a nice clean joint. i use a small paint brush to apply the flux. when tinning, the solder usualy flows only over the part youve just fluxed. so keep the fluxin neat and tidy,and you,l have a neat profesionable looking joint. you must scrub off the remains of the acid flux otherwise it will corode the metal. john

QUOTE (300SLR @ 30 Apr 2012, 18:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Using different melting point solders in a chassis is something of a mixed blessing.
If a high melting point joint does fail, its more difficult to repair without melting the other joints that were done with lower melting point solder.
That's one reason a lot of chassis builders use the same type of solder throughout.

Thanks, but I'm talking about electrical repairs here, not building chassis. I thought I'd said that already, My apologies if I haven't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Update.........
The solder I've been using, Draper Expert, is listed as 60/40. So that's OK, then?

However, I've noticed today that somehow my iron tip (I haven't got 'round to getting another iron yet) is eroding. Is this usual? When I do get a new iron, how do I make sure the tip on it doesn't suffer the same fate?

I still can't get the hang of soldering correctly. I've managed to get a pair of wires soldered to a motor successfully, but the job isn't pretty and I don't imagine it will be very long before it all falls apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
QUOTE (StuBeeDoo @ 19 May 2012, 20:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I've managed to get a pair of wires soldered to a motor successfully
That should read ".....get a pair of wires to stick to the motor terminals.". I wouldn't call it a complete success - more a complete mess that is working, for the moment.
 
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