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All that matters is that it works for you.
But surfice to say the only flux I have ever owned is the tin I use when soldering copper pipes...

Rich
 

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as said before clean and clean again every thing to be soldered ,small dab of rosin flux on both surfaces then tin both pieces and apply a small amount of solder, when your fuseing the parts. on a brass and steel chassis youve got to get it very very clean, use an acid flux and silver solder for the main joints then acid flux and 60-40 solder for the smaller add on parts,like struts to the rear and front wheels, this has a lower melting point than siver solder so your less likely to to remelt the parts youve allready soldered. i tend to flux and tin all the parts to be soldered first, this gives a nice clean joint. i use a small paint brush to apply the flux. when tinning, the solder usualy flows only over the part youve just fluxed. so keep the fluxin neat and tidy,and you,l have a neat profesionable looking joint. you must scrub off the remains of the acid flux otherwise it will corode the metal. john
 

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Using different melting point solders in a chassis is something of a mixed blessing.
If a high melting point joint does fail, its more difficult to repair without melting the other joints that were done with lower melting point solder.
That's one reason a lot of chassis builders use the same type of solder throughout.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
QUOTE (stoner @ 30 Apr 2012, 16:03) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>as said before clean and clean again every thing to be soldered ,small dab of rosin flux on both surfaces then tin both pieces and apply a small amount of solder, when your fuseing the parts. on a brass and steel chassis youve got to get it very very clean, use an acid flux and silver solder for the main joints then acid flux and 60-40 solder for the smaller add on parts,like struts to the rear and front wheels, this has a lower melting point than siver solder so your less likely to to remelt the parts youve allready soldered. i tend to flux and tin all the parts to be soldered first, this gives a nice clean joint. i use a small paint brush to apply the flux. when tinning, the solder usualy flows only over the part youve just fluxed. so keep the fluxin neat and tidy,and you,l have a neat profesionable looking joint. you must scrub off the remains of the acid flux otherwise it will corode the metal. john

QUOTE (300SLR @ 30 Apr 2012, 18:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Using different melting point solders in a chassis is something of a mixed blessing.
If a high melting point joint does fail, its more difficult to repair without melting the other joints that were done with lower melting point solder.
That's one reason a lot of chassis builders use the same type of solder throughout.

Thanks, but I'm talking about electrical repairs here, not building chassis. I thought I'd said that already, My apologies if I haven't.
 

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QUOTE (StuBeeDoo @ 30 Apr 2012, 18:43) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Thanks, but I'm talking about electrical repairs here, not building chassis. I thought I'd said that already, My apologies if I haven't.
Indeed you did, so no apology needed!

Threads often move on to a wider discussion than the originator asked for.
Once somebody starts posting about wider topics (in this case chassis soldering) it's only to be expected that replies will also appear on the thread.
Maybe it would be better if all the chassis soldering stuff was moved to a new thread.
 

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apologies stubeedoo, your question was ansered in the first couple of replies and in the first part of mine. i was just trying to keep the thead going, by branching out into chassis soldering.nothing specific but may be a few tips. john
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Update.........
The solder I've been using, Draper Expert, is listed as 60/40. So that's OK, then?

However, I've noticed today that somehow my iron tip (I haven't got 'round to getting another iron yet) is eroding. Is this usual? When I do get a new iron, how do I make sure the tip on it doesn't suffer the same fate?

I still can't get the hang of soldering correctly. I've managed to get a pair of wires soldered to a motor successfully, but the job isn't pretty and I don't imagine it will be very long before it all falls apart.
 

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60/40 is great. You can still readily get it on line. I don't think it will really be banned, lead free is not allowed in aerospace. There was pressure in 1999 to move everything to lead free but there are some fundamental problems that undermine the long term safety of lead-free.

I agree with Rich, the elevated temperatures needed to melt lead-free make soldering less reliable and can cause damage to components.

I also dont use any paste, if you get solder with flux built in it works easily, no need for more flux.

I also pre-tin parts. It makes joints occur in fractions of a second rather than trying to heat up both parts simulkateously to the melting point. Do have a little fresh solder on the tip.

Try and keep your iron clean, free of debris and tin the tip lightly. But I do also suffer eroding tips, especially the really fine 0.1mm tip ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
QUOTE (StuBeeDoo @ 19 May 2012, 20:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I've managed to get a pair of wires soldered to a motor successfully
That should read ".....get a pair of wires to stick to the motor terminals.". I wouldn't call it a complete success - more a complete mess that is working, for the moment.
 

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QUOTE (StuBeeDoo @ 19 May 2012, 19:07) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>However, I've noticed today that somehow my iron tip (I haven't got 'round to getting another iron yet) is eroding. Is this usual? When I do get a new iron, how do I make sure the tip on it doesn't suffer the same fate?
Yes tip erosion is normal, replacement tips are available for most irons.
The better quality iron plated tips that some irons come with last much longer
Plain copper tips erode fairly quickly - it is common practice to redress them with a file.
 

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I use a Hakko station, cost way too much but works really well. I solder PCB chassis' and various wires for the slots, but have also used it to repair guitars, fix a few synthesizers, built two synths from kits (Shruthi-1, check them out if you're into music), repaired my computer monitor and made all sorts of audio cables.

I use extra flux sometimes, just liquid stuff. It's handy on the PCB chassis' and also for making audio cables, but I don't use it for smaller stuff. A clean surface and shiny soldering tip are usually enough.

Randy
 

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Hope it's okay opening this old thread, better than starting another I suppose.

Can someone help me here? I'm trying to solder a wire to a brass eyelot (see pic below) and the solder simply refuses to adhere to the brass. I'm using 60/40 solder and from reading through the thread, some say there's no need for soldering paste, some say it is best to use it to make the job easier.

I'm really hopeless at soldering, hit and miss with me but this issue has me pulling my hair out.

Why is the solder not sticking to the brass, where am I going wrong?

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Product
 

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Looks like your brass is dirty, which will prevent the solder from sticking - use a file or sandpaper to clean it off well (even if it wasn't dirty, you need to do this, since metals oxidize to various degrees, and that prevents the solder from sticking)

Put a bit of soldering paste on the clean eyelet, load a bit of solder on your HOT iron and touch it to the eyelet while holding the wire against it - oh yeah, "tin" the wire and eyelet first for best results: after cleaning the eyelet put a bit of paste on it, load the iron tip with a bit of solder and touch it to the eyelet so it's got a thin coating of solder; dip the wire in paste and ditto.

If the eyelet is close to the motor and touching the brush arm do this all very quickly no nothing melts or demagnetizes!

That should take care of it.

Don
 

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Also ....... avoid the plastic bodywork. I would remove the motor to do this soldering ...... :thumbsup:
 
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Most solder has paste built in. I find using paste eventually eats at everything around it, turns green and generally a bad idea in my experience.
 

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I agree with Rick, don't use flux/paste on a wire, it will wick its way up under the insulation and make a mess.

Always use solder purpose made for electrical/electronic soldering, don't try to save money, buy from Farnell or RS components.

Joel
 

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Rick, Joel,

I disagree: never had any problems of that type using soldering paste, and I find the solder with a flux core alone not very efficient in making joints - the paste really helps the critical heat transfer. Maybe not logical, but that's my experience.

This doesn't apply when using acid flux of course: that really needs to be cleaned off right away.

Soldering also needs to be taken in context: silver solder and acid flux is often recommended by the "pros", but they're running very high-speed machines and joints have to be very strong. I run vintage cars a few times a year, for maybe 30 minutes tops in a race, so have found regular 60/40 solder and paste flux largely adequate - I do use acid when soldering pinions or piano wire of course.

Don
 
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