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Gary Skipp
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I don't know about anyone else, but I find that my fingers hurt after a while. Does anyone else experience this?

If I'm buying a new controller, is there one that adapts to both sport and 3 pin plug? I'm guessing not but I may aswell ask.
 

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Loads of them!

Parma, Fly, Red Fox, Professor Motor, MRRC and Carrera.

I'd say Fly are the best, 35ohm all the way!

Everyone else will say Professor motor, but that's because they have been brainwashed by someone evil. One person might tell you to buy Scalextric stuff, ignore them... as you've found out, it's crap.

Speak to Pendle for adapters and/or plugs to put on. If you put a Scalextric plug (think it's like a phono jack) then you can have an inline socket wired up to a 3 pin plug. Simple. I'm sure someone out there has a picture and diagrams of which wire goes where...

Fly...

Lotus

PS. Fly
 

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Allan Wakefield
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All the controllers suppliedwith manufacturer sets (Carrera, Ninco, Artin and Scalextric etc) are next to useless compared to the ones from Companies like Parma, Red Fox Professor motor etc.

One of THE BEST changes anyone can make to their home set is to replace the controllers. Which one to buy is a maze of conflicting and usually personal view points.

What you have to decide on first is the use you will make of them.
If they are simply for homeset use on a small circuit (permenant or changing) and you will only be running the few standard cars you have, then a simple 45 Ohm Parma Economy or even a more basic Red Fox copy will suffice and be 110% better than the ones that came with your set.

However if you play with your cars in the tuning sense and change motors, increase magnets etc etc, or begin to race at a Club level, you will find one controller with one Ohm setting will cease to be enough.

This leads to either multiple Parma like controllers with differing Ohm ratings (for instance a high magnet car will respons alot better to a lower Ohm rated controller)
OR an electronic controller like the silver series Professor motor ones. The advantage of an electronic controller is that it adjusts to the requirements of your car in relation to the current it draws and the current required to get it running.

Of course, as is normal, with variying controllers and set ups you (especially with electronic) get into the wiring nightmare where some layouts are wired in a way that will not work with electronic controllers until a polarity switch is installed or the power base is not suitable for the resistor controller you just bought etc etc.

It is a real minefield that needs homework and research until you are happy to purchase the controller that is right for you.

All the above are entry level controllers and run for about the cost of a new car or maybe two.

There is another level of controller that even less people subscribe to, with the option to vary braking effect, acceleration and even traction control but these are infinately more costly and not for the home user in my experience (check out Ruddock, NSR or the top end PM ones).

SO, I probably made things worse
choice wise but I hope that you will research the options and get the one suitable for you and not waste money on buying impulsively, only to find you need another because it was not right for you.

Fitting wise I would consider getting one with banana plugs fitted and getting adaptors made to suit the plugs at the tracks you will be racing on. Banana plugs are a world wide standard as are the colours used for brake, power and neutral (differs in some countries but all are aware of the differences and can tell you what goes where) Parma wire colours are the most widely adopted, with the Germans having a large following for their colour system. Of course in this, as in many hobbies a standard does NOT mean it is used everywhere by everyone without fail, just that it is commonly known and widely used.

If I HAD to lay out a basic choice for a beginner, based on cost, quality and useability then I would plump for Parma Economy or Professor Motor 2044. Of the others available I find them either lacking in quality, uncomfortable, too heavy or just plain useless.
 

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I am a home racer, and think swiss has summed up all the issues very well. I have a 40 ohm and 25 ohm red fox, as well as the 60 ohm scaly controller.

I find the 40 ohm works perfectly with 90% of cars, and addequately with the rest

The 25 ohm works brilliantly with that 10% left over, and ok for a few more. So i would take the 40 ohm to the desert island if i was only allowed to take one (and the desert island had an electricity supply)

Also note - the 10% of cars that need the 25 ohm are ones where I have added more magnets and stuff. All the box standards seem to work gr8 with the 40 ohm

The 60 ohm isnt ideal with any of my cars

(by great i mean: cars start to move when the trigger is pulled slightly, and dont reach full speed/revs till the trigger is almost fully pulled, allowing a lot of trigger travel for the range of speeds the car will do)
 

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except that he does have a carrera and not a scalex track...
so no reason to adapt to scalex then me thinks

//peter
 

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Swissracer's post is the one to print off and take with you to the shop


However, what it doesn't address is the pain in your finger. This is where the Parma Economy throttle comes into play, IMHO it has a nice sculpted metal trigger, easy on the old digits.


Mark.
 

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Excellent post by Swiss and a fairly strong concensus that 35-45 ohms in orthodox resister types covers most home car requirements, even with fairly high powered motors.
The only one of significance that Swiss omitted was Difalco, but at around £200 quid, it isn't going to bother very many of us a great deal!
 

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Allan Wakefield
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QUOTE However, what it doesn't address is the pain in your finger. This is where the Parma Economy throttle comes into play, IMHO it has a nice sculpted metal trigger, easy on the old digits.

Not alot you can do about aching fingers except practice!

Other options to hours of racing (with a comfy trigger) are: beckoning to the stunners in the street as you pass (likely to get you pulled over for kerb crawling), stroking your kids pet rabbit behind the ears (makes your clothes hairy this time of year and anyway they taste better than they feel) or picking your nose (TIP: If you are older than early teens do this in private
)

Oh yes! I forgot Difalco, up among the Ruddocks and NSRS price wise though.

There are also the electronic boxes that plug between resistor controllers and the track (already mentioned I think). They stop you having to buy three or four differing resistor sizes and cost around the same as a Parma Eco. However I think I would plump for a good quality Electronic with polarity switch given the choice of the two.

45 Ohm is the way to go for a basic home use controller if you decide you want a resistor one.
 

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Like LMP04 I have been stuck with the useless Scalextric controllers and only recently released (thanks to this Forum!) that a more advanced controller can transform home slot racing.

But, I can't make up my mind on which type to buy, I quite like the idea of the resistor type - because my collection covers Scaley, Ninco, SCX, Fly and some Slot.it cars. And also I am thinking of joining a club, which I understand could have a different set-up in regards to how the controllers are plugged into the circuit.

However on a recent visit to MRE, Gary (I think its Gary?) mentioned that a good quality is important - but also it helps to have a good power supply to the track. Therefore not using the standard Hornby transformers and the Sport power bases and instead 'hard-wiring' the track - Gary made it sound easy, but I am a complete wally when it comes to electronics. So does this factor also decide what controller is the best?

Also at the mo I am leaning towards a Fly variable controller - has anyone used on of these?

Cheers

Mark

PS: MRE's service was as awesome as ever, thanks to everyone there!
 

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my home racer observations (i like the 40 ohm resister for almost all my cars) is based on a scaly sport with 2 standard scaly power wall wort things. Most of my cars have the original motor and magnets in, others have more magnets and a couple have slot-it motors in. This seems to work very well, on my twisty track, I am rarely able to give full throttle to any of my cars; looks like i have AMPle power!
 

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If you so wish then yes. Have the controller made up with a scaley jackplug on it, but then have a socket for thqt jackplug leading to the 3 pin plug arrangement.

Mark.
 
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