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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the 6 car APB with stock controllers. And while I've run some laps I've not gone crazy with hours on the track. That said, with the controller I've used the most (lane 1) the car still gets some throttle power even when the trigger is fully released. I've tried pulling the trigger out a little and sometimes that cuts the throttle off, sometimes not. I'm certain its the controller as when I try another controller in that port it acts normally. Can you clean these controllers? If so, whats the basic procedure?

Thank you!

Regards,

-- Rakete --
 

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Greg Gaub
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Yep. It's easy. Pop off the two plastic panels (color on top, and silver on the grip), then take out the three screws. All the parts stay in one side. Take a cotton bud and swab off the sliding resistor on both sides. I like to use a little drop of INOX MX3 on the bud, then go back over with a dry bud to take up any excess INOX or dirt that it loosened. Reassemble and you should be good.
 

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Prof I T
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hi
deoxit eh chris,are you in to the high end audio then.??
 

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Bigbird,
Nope, never tried it on audio connections - high frequencies disappeared from my hearing range many years ago - just after a 1971 hundred and something dB Status Quo concert in fact
. I just use it for the controllers & sometimes a dab on tarnished rail contacts.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've used lighter fluid followed by just a drop of superlube w/ptfe then wiped clean on my analog Professor Motors. Anything to be worried about with that? And thanks for the replies.

Regards,

-- Rakete --
 

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This little mod came up while working on the wireless throttles, however I thinks it's lost there, so will try here as well.

Would quite like a couple of people with "dodgy" throttles to try this and report back?

QUOTE (RichG @ 8 May 2012, 11:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Can somebody else please try this?



See the posts above for the theory. It's not as dramatic as when the resistor is used as a potentiometer in the wireless throttle, however I have seen a significant improvment on all my reject throttles when joining the end of the potentiometer to the slider.

Follow the link for more information on why this might improve a noisy / jerky throttle.

Rich
 

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Greg Gaub
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If the throttle was completely non-functional, then I don't think this mod will make it perfect. The fact that it helped at all is notable.

I just did the mod on a couple throttles with positive results. Neither could make a car go a full lap with the LC button held down without a track call (resistance matching the brake button), but after the mod, they both work flawlessly. On the first, I did wipe the slider with my thumb, so that might have had an impact. On the second, I made a point to not touch that at all, and it still works perfectly after the mod, even with all the smudge left on the slider that was likely causing the problem.

I'm also thinking of modding my controllers with a hole taken out of the shell, under where the color cap goes, so that I can just pull off the color cap and do the cleaning without taking it apart. With the mod, cleaning should be much less common, but not having to take the controller apart to clean it will make those few cleanings even less of a nuisance.


Thanks Rich for sharing this great mod to make the controller more reliable!
 

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Greg Gaub
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A little update on the controllers I've modded as above. I've managed to kill two of them. I blame myself and my low quality soldering iron, but I believe I killed them with too much heat. I couldn't get the solder to stick or the original solder to melt without more heat than is usually needed. I think the resistor was sucking up some heat, and in the end was damaged by it. I can see no signs of physical damage, but neither controller can make a car go, let alone calibrate. They work as though no controller is even connected.

So, word to the wise, which really applies to all soldering jobs. Be quick about it! Get in and get it done, and get out. Another trick I should have used is to add a heat sink by clipping an alligator clip to the ends of the contacts to be soldered. That way, the excess heat goes into the clip rather than the resistor.

Fortunately, I already had a couple spare, so was not down two controllers when the guys came over for a race last night.
 

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Living the Life&#33;
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You do need to make sure that your iron is spotlessly clean before you attempt to solder. The easiest way to do this is to heat up the iron so that it is at normal working temperature then wipe the tip on a wet sponge and apply a little bit of solder to it to prevent oxidisation occuring.

It would be a good practice to wipe the tip and re-tin it every time you make a joint.
 

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Greg Gaub
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I think the tip is just really crappy, because it just won't clean. I always wipe the tip after a join, but this one is probably the worst I've ever had. Tip cleaner doesn't even help.
I blame my iron, but also myself for buying it and then trying to use it after it's clearly so bad. ;-)
I need to get me a good quality iron.
 

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When I underwent my training as an Audiologist, I was taught to use a fine file to remove pits in the tip and fine grade sandpaper for the sides to keep it shiny.

This was in the days before we had coated tips but on a badly pitted iron it does revive it well .............
 

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QUOTE (GregK @ 1 Jun 2012, 08:48) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>When I underwent my training as an Audiologist, I was taught to use a fine file to remove pits in the tip and fine grade sandpaper for the sides to keep it shiny.

This was in the days before we had coated tips but on a badly pitted iron it does revive it well .....
That works well with unplated copper soldering iron tips.
It is not recommended for plated tips because it wears away the plating. Once you break through the plating, the tips erode surprisingly rapidly.
 
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