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provider of comestables
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I hope this link Works.

Many thanks to the guys who made suggestions when my first masking attempt went so wrong.
Yes this is not perfect but its much better than it was and there are probably some issues with the shape of my shell as well.

I do not recomend this. I used 3mm masking tape as it seemed better than the 4mm i had before. I sprayed the shell all white thinking the black paint would cover better but might have been better doing it the other way around because I had to keep telling myself I was masking off the white lines not the black and your dealing with a negative of the original.


Also this is a Dazzel pattern and thats exactly what it does my eyes hurt but i must away to paint in repairs and neaten up by hand before working on a chassis
Cheers Dave
 

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Pete Shepherd
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Very brave man, a bit of touching up and no one will know! Looking forward to seeing more of this one.

Pete
 

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At the risk of being wise after the event...

You probably would have been better off to put wider masking tape on your cutting board and then use a metal rule and scalpel/exacto to cut to desired width. The problem with trying to use the existing edge of masking tape is that the "edge" of the adhesive layer has already been exposed to the air and dried out when it sat on the roll so never sits down as neatly as the stuff in the middle of the tape does which is why you have those "feathers" of paint bleed.

It took me several poorly-masked vac-form shells and a book on painting RC shells which explained the above before I twigged.

When I do black-and-other-colour chequerboards on fantasy wargames figures I use a Rotring-style technical pen with black ink to draw out the lines and then hand-paint the black with slightly thinned black acrylic (having first dotted each black section to avoid any "out-of-synch" disasters). You could try this on the shell by using masking tape merely a guide to get a straight line out of the pen.

Coop
 

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Tony
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I don't know what masking tape you use but I always use Tamiya. Comes in loads of different widths and have not suffered paint creep with it.
 

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Peter Farrell
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I use Tamiya and I used to get bleed until I read a treatise on masking and learned to do exactly as coop suggested.
Peter
 

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provider of comestables
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi folks, dont get me wrong its my second major go with masking the tape is Tamia but i used a tip a guy suggested last time and it has worked miles better from my point of view I was quite down after the first go cos it takes an age to line up the tapes. Ill bear those other tips in mind though as i have a Brooklands Deemster shell I am working on and that is checkerboard yellow and black.

I am actually pleased with these two as i feel i can turn them around quite easily and i am now itching to work on other bits like painting the details they need like getting some realistic looking leather seats the dash and sorting out a chassis to fit under. Any one know a source of Africa Corp 1:32 figures as there is a picture of this car at speed with driver and passenger in short sleeves and just goggles. I hope to keep posting shots of these two as they develop.
Thanks Dave.
 

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Another trick I forgot to mention is to either mist the shell with varnish once the tape on or to run a brush loaded with Future/Klear along the edges. Both help seal the tape down.

The Airfix 1:32 Afrika Korps is back in production, ModelZone stock them -http://www.modelzone.co.uk/airfix-1-32-wwi...-model-kit.html. Another good source of useful heads will be the aftermarket 1:35 resin heads produced for military modellers - loads of WW2 German heads amongst that lot.

The pen I use for chequerboards is the Copic Multiliner with a 0.1mm nib - [URL=]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Copic-Multiliner-B...202&sr=8-12

Coop
 

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Hi Dave,

I know that you're waiting to see what paint job I will do with the Straker body I bought from you.

Unfortunately you've got to wait some time before I'll start the project, as I got some other projects to go first.
And there are some parts I still have to acquire.

I hope you don't see my comment as an attack on your person, but I think your biggest problem is your painting technique itself.
This is how I'll do it. I've done similar paint jobs in the past on model aircraft. Unfortunately I don't have them anymore to show you.

First your body must be made smooth, things like the radiator lid, I would sand away and drill a hole instead, where to insert the lid after the paint job.
The panel lines are to rough and deep on the model, so these I'll fill up and engrave them again, like I did with almost all my resin models. I've done a small tutorial on the Mercedes W125 project I work on at the moment.
Make sure the body is fully grease free. I'll always give it a wash with a soap water and a soft brush. Then make sure all soap leftovers are washed away with clear running water. Don't tray to touch the model again with your fingers, I use medical gloves, and let it dry on air in a dust free plastic container, something like an ice cream box would be perfect. Drill some holes in the side of the box, to release the moister.

I don't know what kind of paint you use, but for such a job I would recommend Humbrol Enamel, some of you would swear on acrylics, but I'm not convinced on them.
A good double action airbrush is necessary on such a job, make sure it can tolerate oil base paints.
I would start applying a thin layer of Humbrol primer nr1, leave it to dry at least 24 H.

Then apply your white. Do it in very thin layers, and wait at least a minimum of half an hour. The thinner you apply your layers, the better your result will be, hold your airbrush a minimum of 25 Cm (10 In).
This process can take you a hole day. When finisched, leave the white paint to dray out for at least a hole week, Preferable in sunlight, the UV will help to harden the paint.

I agree with the others on the use of Tamiya masking tape, it sticks much better. But again do not touch your model with your fingers, put medical gloves on, than wash your hands so the talcum is washed away. I know it's annoying to where gloves during the masking, but it's for the better course.
Press the tape well in into the pannel lines, use a stump needle.

Than the black part, again like the white one, the thinner your layers are, the better. Wait here at least an hour in between, and make sure, to keep the distance between your model and the airbrush as big as possible. The paint almost has to dust down half dry on the model. And that was you biggest problem, your paint is to thin, wet and to much applied at one time.

Leave you model than to dry for 24 H before pulling of the tape. Do not pull the tape of under a 90° angle, always under a sharp 30° angle.

So Dave, this is how I'm going to do it. I now that the paint job on the model can be a pain in the as, but I think time and patience is your biggest ally.
Perhaps it's good to have an other project running at the same time, it keeps your mind of the model and gives it it's needed rest.

Anyway keep up the good spirit and let us know your progress


Courage


Cheers,
Danny
 

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Phil Smith
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I'd go with Owen's advice, a single coat of something clear, doesn't really matter what, between the two colours should solve your problems.
Also always spray the lightest colour first, in this case the white, then you do not need to be so heavy with the darker coats to cover the first colour, this should help with any bleeding through.
 

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provider of comestables
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nice find good photo useful partial dash as well. Thanks.

The two are progressing so i will drag them up to the light of day soon but wanted to make a start at chassis.
Cheers Dave
 

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provider of comestables
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes great Thank you. interestingly, well at least to me, there must be two examples out there as I photographed one at Good wood years ago but it had its radiator in brass and not painted. I was looking at some Brooklands photos of the car and its paint work was dodgy as well so feel even better for that.
 

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Hi Dave
I had a good look around this one when it was at Windsor last weekend and whilst the paintwork isnt brilliant the strangest thing is that the stripes on the underpan are almost twice the width as those on the rest of the body and do not match at all
john
 

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Hi Dave
I had a good look around this one when it was at Windsor last weekend and whilst the paintwork isnt brilliant the strangest thing is that the stripes on the underpan are almost twice the width as those on the rest of the body and do not match at all
john
 

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provider of comestables
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I bet and i know why from painting mine. when you change direction again for the under chassis lines it all falls apart and the gaps are uneven must be something that is caused by the angles involved but i got the same effect.
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Hi Dave,

Your doing a terrific build here, despite the problems you had with painting.
They also have to consider that the body is also your own home made casting, so well done my friend
.

Have you made any progress on the models can't wait to see them?

Also thanks to the others who've published photos of the real thing, they went strait into the car portfolio I have here for my future build.
More Photo's are always welcome a specially the old ones, when the car was effectively racing at Brooklands seem to be rare.

Cheers,
Danny
 

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sorry dave, i dont like the paint scheme. it reminds me of cascais in portugul. they,ve laid the street tiles in that wavy pattern, it makes you feel drunk just looking at it, letalone navigateing it after a skinfull of beer. i know it will turn out brilliantly as useual. john
 

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Hello David,
No there aren't two of the Brooklands Straker Squire's only the one, X2, which I owned for a number of years and rebuilt completely. I put the stripes back on which had been off the car for about 30 years and owned it when you saw it at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. I didn't paint the radiator at the time but I see that the present owner has done so. The reason that the undertray stripes do not match the ones on the body work is because I didn't repaint the undertray when I did the rest of the car. The incorrect width and angle of the undertray stripes were painted on by a previous owner, Adrian Lidell, in the 1970's.

It may interest you to know that the width of the black and white stripes are not only different to each other in order to get the visual effect right but that they actually get thinner as they progress down the length of the car. The fist time that I marked them out, using two original photos from the Brooklands days, and with even width black and white stripes, I found that I had not only got the incorrect total number of stripes but the white stripes visually looked two thin. After a lot of calculations and to get the correct visual effect and number of stripes--because remember I was working on the original body so the total length had to be correct--I came up with this formula for the stripes:

Starting from the front, and you may have noticed that there is a little black triangle on the front of the radiator cowl which is 2" to its "point", the first black stripe was 11.8cm wide, then next white ones was 15.8cm, then B11.6cm, W15.6cm, B 11.5cm, W 15.3cm, B 11.4cm, etc etc until you get to the end. I made one mistake in that I didn't know how the stripes finished at the tail of the car when viewed from the rear and in later years found a contemporary photo of the car, viewed from the rear, it had a black circle, like a target.

And if you are going to make a slot model of the car as in 1921 with the six exhaust pipes down the outside, rather than one underneath as in 1919, then look closely at the photo that is on the web of it going around the banking and you will see that five pipes come out the side of the bonnet and one, number five cylinder in fact, comes out behind the bulkhead line; if I remember correctly they also go straight back without the kink that the pipes have at present.

I was a most exiting vintage car to drive and made a superb sound, especially over 4000 rpm which was approaching 95 mph, but was rather hair raising in modern traffic with only rear wheel brakes.

Hope that helps and good luck with the model.

Nick Howell
 

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i really admire you guys that go to the time and trouble and research to build an accurate scale model. i just butcher most cars[neatly] mostly old F1,s, if a wing or nose doesn,t look right to me i just buid new ones to what i fancy. i,ve even changed an airfix kit of an mg magnet or suchlike[i,ve forgotten what model it was] but the rear[rumble] seat was plasticarded over and a spare wheel put on top, its got a bently blower on the side and 4 ally exhausts each side, teminating in fishtail silencers , dropped into the weeds on a 1,5 brass chassis with a loose pod holding a cheata motor. i t really shifts and holds the track good and its not as bad as it sounds. just like a garden shed build. even new cars dont escape. i, ve just put narrow group 5 type wing on a porsche fly gti evo. it completely changes the appearance and i,m happy with it. john
 
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