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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi There, i recently accuired a 1/32 Strombecker Cheetah, and am trying to find out about the spec's on the motor. The motor appears to be a can style design. It is green at both ends of the motor and was manufactured in Japan. What voltage would this motor be?? And is there a motor that will fit in its place without any modifications. The current motor smells hot when run on a Ninco Track. The chassis allso has a bit of ajustment for the changeing or the wheel base. Would be thankfull for any info or history you can give me. Thanks Robert V.
 

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Take the motor apart and clean it up. These old motors usually have oil and gunk buildup on the motor commutator and brushes from over oiling of the bearings. Take some 1500 grit sandpaper and clean the comm and and clean the brushes with alcohol. These green motors are just about worthless since they didn't have metal bearings and the brush retainer setup was very poor. If your not concerned about keeping original parts then you can hot glue an FK-130 motor of the TSRF/Cheetah/FOX type into the chassis without damaging the chassis.( http://www.mabuchi-motor.co.jp/cgi-bin/cat...T_ID=fk_130rhsh ) There are various medium/low performance versions available from different mfgrs.
check out http://slotcarnews.blogspot.com/2007/02/sl...motor-list.html
Bob put a pretty good list together and you can find most of the FK-series by spec.

Jimmy
 

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Hi Robert,
This is my Cheetah. Is your motor like this one? This one is very slow and struggles to move the car. I haven't had chance to investigate it yet.


Allan
 

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The motor you have is a cheaper version of the above blue endbell one, generically called a "hemi" - built by a Japanese company for Strombecker and a few other American manufacturers.

They're actually pretty fast motors when in decent shape, but the small cylindrical brushes are a weak point, and it's hard to find replacements for them. On the other hand, there are hundreds of these motors easily available on ebay...

As said above, if you take it apart and clean it, that will probably help alot, assuming there are no broken wires on the armature. Just be careful when you remove the brush clips or screws, since the spring tends to pop out and get lost on the floor!

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Guys, thanks for the info, The model that i have must be a newer version than the ones shown in your photo's. It has two green plastic ends not a single blue end like the one's shown . The Chassis is made of plastic not metal. So i would think it is later version. What i would like to do is upgrade the motor to the stock chassis, I have tried to replace the stock chassis with a slot it HRS inline but the wheel base of the car is to short. The chassis was not attached to the body via screws but with plastic press in plugs. Thank Again Jimmy, Allan, And Don for the info you have provided. Robert V.
 

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Phil Smith
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Ah Strombecker, the words 'can of beans' and 'minefield' don't do this company justice!


Picture below shows the motor Robert has on the left, not very good, but some chassis were fitted with the motor to the right of it which has the same dimensions and is actually quite a good motor, it's sort of a 'mini hemi'
Also shown are the '16D' and '36D' hemis on the right to give an idea of sizes



Later Strombecker (the French or Canadian division I believe) also fitted the same chassis with a normal Mabuchi using plastic adaptors, as usual with Strombecker there was more than one type!

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, that would be the one, the chassis on the left is the animal i have. Engineering it's not, the gear size on it is only out done by the tire diameter. Axle's sit in slots in the chassis with no bearings. Going to modify the chassis to take slot it brass bearings and running gear. Probably have to make an adapter to hold the new motor. Thanks again for the great photo's and help with the motor ID. Robert V.
 

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Robert,
It might be easier to use some 3/32" ID(1/8" OD) brass tube as "bearings" It can be slid right into the plastic holder and glued in place. This requires no cutting and is my standard upgrade to these and other Stromie plastic chassis when I go to the smaller axle size.

If you just want to take slop out but keep original axle just over lub each axle point, add a couple of drops of super glue to the axle/chassis interface and then run with rear wheels lifted off track or test station at low speed for about a minute until the super glue sets. put a paper towel under the rear end to catch any ejected glue/oil. This will make new "bearings" that have no slop. Just relube and away you go. If you happen to screw this procedure up you can just clean out the superglue from the plastic and axle and start again.

You might also want to update the guide to a more modern design with less slop.

I have a whole pile of these chassis and if they are tweeked right they work as well as any of the modern plastic ones.

Jimmy
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Jimmy, thanks for the rear axle modifacation info. Here's what i have done. I took two Slot it brass axle bearings and placed them on an axle for alignment. I then heated the bearings till the chassis melted and the bearings seated themselves into the plastic cut out in the frame. They where in there real tight but i didn;t want to chance them coming lose so i added a bit of apoxi glue. The front i did what you sugested for the rear axle , only i used plastic tubing and installed it in the old front axle location and glued it allso. Right now i am modifing the frame where the motor sits to install an SCX42 motor. Thanks again for the input. It's much appreciated. Robert V
 
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