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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A recent ebay find and a curious case: a rather nice scratch-built chassis, with long drop arm, red foam tires in back, small fronts - but a Pittman DC70 and bevel gears - roughly a gap of 2 or 3 years in the two technologies! Just an indication of somebody not being able to afford the latest Champion rewind, so using what he had on hand, or ....? And what's the deal with the cut down guide flag - reducing friction?

Any theories?

Don


 

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Tony Condon
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Hi Don
My suspician is that the guide may just be broken ,I,ve seen plenty of jet flags go like that in long distance races and on old slot cars

Cheers tony
 

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Duh, that's easy. He was obviously a time traveller who went in to the future to get some fancy tyres to come back and beat the other club members with, but not knowing what can motors looked like failed to recognize one so didn't purchase one.
Next...
 

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It obviously isn't a runner as it stands.
Is there any way to be sure if it ever ran on those tyres?
And even if it did run, it could have run so badly on those tyres that it was quickly abandoned.
Maybe somebody got a box of old bits and had a go at putting together whatever fitted.

Is it possible to see if the guide has actually been cut to that shape, or as Tony sugests could it just be broken?
Parma did sell jet flags with tapers cut both ends a bit like that for use on plastic track for their "homeset" cars. Possibly a bad copy of that?
(As you probably know, there are much better ways of cutting down a guides to work on Scalex track!)
Even if it was deliberately cut down, maybe it was one of those "seemed like a good idea at the time" things. Is there a reason to think the guy who did it knew what he was doing?
 

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Slot King
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Don, surely, someone fitted the wide foamies later in the car's life; either in a misguided attempt to make it go faster, or just because that's all they had on hand.
I have quite a few like that. In fact, all the cars I got in that South African racing box were like that.

I'll post a couple of strange anachronism I have somewhere.

Joel
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Be glad to see them Joel! I remember doing stuff like this is 65 or so, altho not as radical, because of money constraints - a weekly allowance would go only so far, and you did with what you had on hand - after all, 50 cents for a guide or gear could be your whole weekly allowance! Between this and some of the anachronistic cars I've found (see below), I tend to think it was designed like this from the beginning - those 1/32 size tires on the front would go with red foamies on the back (Classic according to PdL). Hard to tell if they were original or not, but either is possible.

In any case, the soldering is well done, and the axle holder soldered to the motor, plus ball bearings on the rear would tend to indicate an adult doing this in the first place, so maybe that is an indication of a later upgrade...





(note the very contemporary body and low-ride tireshere - along with homemade steering and outdated motor - this is the car that got me thinking about this stuff in the first place).

I took a closer look at the guide, and it could very well just be broken off - kind of an irregular break, consistent with that. It's one of those thin Classic guides, with regular self-tapping screws, not a jet flag. And it has kept full depth (5/16"), so was not cut down for a home track...

Don
 

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Phil Smith
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I've seen loads of guides cut down like that, I guess it was to reduce friction.
Also seen loads of funny stuff like this and why not, just 'cause it wasn't what was winning in the clubs at this time doesn't mean people wouldn't be putting odd things together at home, I know I certainly did at the time, can't see why you find it odd or even worth commenting on.
Just break it up for the good bits Don (if there are any) and throw the rest in the garbage, and that goes for that second one you have shown.

(I guess a smiley might be appropriate here, but I feel grumpy this morning so there isn't one)
 

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Hi Don,
I remember at that time that the clubs around south London had a class for 1/18th? scale midgets (American style oval racers).
The bodies we used were vac forms by GT Models. Wasn't Howmet going to do a repop of one of these?
The rules required the use of an open frame motor but the rest of the design was free.
This is exactly the style of chassis that we built although most of us Brits used cheaper MRRC 3 pole motors.
The class developed in time. First with brass rod chassis and eventually allowing early can motors in.
The idea was to have a class in which we could continue to use some old and obsolete kit.
Great fun it was too. The cars were relatively slow, evenly matched and very easy to drive with those big sponge tyres.
I suspect your chassis may have been built for, or used in a similar class.
Cheers.
****.
 

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QUOTE (scaleslotcars @ 24 Jul 2011, 13:01) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>(I guess a smiley might be appropriate here, but I feel grumpy this morning so there isn't one)

This morning?

Actually, I think you're both right - there were a lot of cars built just for fun, with the means at one's disposal. And now that you mention it ****, there were even some classes like that proposed at the height of the US slot boom, to give a lower-cost option to local racers... (but I think Pittman was still pushing the DC70-6 volt version as late as 1966, as a hi-reliability competitive option).

But Phil, break these up, the new jewels in my collection???

Actually, this one seems to match the Revell 1/24 GTO, so it might be a fun restoration.

Don
 

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Phil Smith
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Don, I take back what I said, **** has now made it worth a lot of money as the only surviving example of a South London 1/18th Midget chassis, what'll you take for it?
I can see this ending up in California!
 

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Slot King
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Here is the first one of mine, a genuine anglewinder with steering.
Either this guy invented anglewinders long before anyone else, or, he was a bit slow giving up steering.


Joel
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice one Joel! I think it was just an older guy who had raced in the 50s and early 60s, when all model racing cars HAD to have steering - and everybody knew they were faster around the tight corners like that, as Model Maker always insisted...

Don
 

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Tony Condon
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Hi Joel
Well he obviously hadn,t invented anglewinders before taylormade ,whose gears he was using

Cheers tony
 

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Actually, not all that anachronistic Joel - if you look at the winner of the big Western States Race in late 65 or early 66, a lot of the cars already had the o-ring fronts and even wider U-Go type rear tires, along with the hot Pittman 196-65X type motors. I'll try to scare up a photo for you... the Thingie-fication of slot racing started rather early in the game....

Don

PS: couldn't resist finding this one right away, from the February 1966 issue of Rod & Custom, so the race must have been in November or December 65 - still a majority of open frame motors as you can see, but the article talks about the rewinders Nick Mura, Gordon French and Bob Lenz...

 

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The Joe De Halle Cooper had dual rear tires. We used to do this all the time so as to fit the extra-wide Classic rims that were available then, but no runner was wide enough. You can see a surviving set of this on this 1967 car of mine:



Never heard of Joe De Halle again after this win...
 
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