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redstar
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Hi,heres a set owned by my friend Mark made in Dallas Texas & sold in January 1959.
This set was made & sold before the 1/24th Strombecker set. The cars were 1/24th scale promo bodies on a metal chassis. There was a guide blade in front & a pin in the rear. 2 metal wires conducted the current like the earliest Vip cars. The track was made of hardboard with a metal type top. Each lane had a slot in it for the cars.The 2 controllers controlled the speed & could go forward & reverse.strange isnt it,Dallas Texas.
the set sold to the public in January 1959,so it was produced in 1958.thanks,Bernard Sampson
 

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Joel LeNoir
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952 Posts
Very cool. That 59 corvette promo body is the nicest I have ever seen. I sold my vette promo for a little over $ 2000 & she had a sticker stain on the hood. A corvette collector would pay a mint for that set.

Thanks for sharing
 

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Administrator
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9,847 Posts
Excellent Bernard! Is that the only one known to exist?

Certainly looks like a production item, but I wonder how many were actually made and sold.

Vaguely reminiscent of the Ideal rail cars... I was always a little surprised that more budding slot car manufacturers didn't make greater use of the plastic kits around at the time...

Don
 

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368 Posts
Bernard,
Very nice and interesting set, probably unseen and unheard of by most people. Until now.
Many thanks for showing!

(Thanks also for the much-better-than-usual pics of these exhibits.
)

As you live in Texas, as well as Mark, the owner of the set, and as the set was also made
in Texas, I guess very few of these moved out of Texas, or even the local area around
Dallas back in the late 1950 production days.

It also appears that advertising and marketing wasn't exactly the strongest departments with
the Electromat Company. No big brouhaha was set in marketing for this novel invention, and
I've only found this tiny ad for this remarkable piece of toy/hobby equipment, appearing a few
times among the small classified ads in the Popular Mechanics magazine in 1959 and 1960
(outlined in red below):



I assume the track and the car's mechanics were produced locally in Dallas, but it would also
be interesting to know the origin of the nice Corvette and VW Bug plastic bodies, given that
plastic wasn't that common back in these days of mostly tin plate toy manufacturing.

Another interesting aspect of this ancient set is that the cars apparently featured a mechanical
setup with sidewinder, front-wheel friction drive! Nothing new under the sun, eh?
 

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Premium Member
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5,199 Posts
Bernard,
Looks like a winner. Never heard of this one before, what a find!

Motors look like Pittman DC 60 with friction drive, but it is a bit surprising to me since I did not think that this particular version of the DC 60 motor was produced for train models before 1961. The older version that dates from WW2 is a bit different is several aspects.

Also interesting is the "Model Motoring" name, something that might have caused them some trouble?
 

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Senior Slot Car Mechanic
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Doc, I'm pretty sure that motor dates to mid fifties. Dad was doing HO trains in the mid to late 50s, and, had several powering some of his die cast locos from that period.

I know, because, I pinched one to build a car in 64, and, it was quite old and well worn by then.
 

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Premium Member
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Yes, it's possible, the picture is a bit small and I might be misreading details. Amazingly the DC 60 dates from WW2 and was used by the US Navy for various functions. After the war ended, a huge number of them were dumped on the civilian market and this is when they ended powering model-train locomotives...
 

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Administrator
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And congratulations to Bertil for finding that Popular Mechanics ad - amazing bit of research!

What was the date of the first issue you found that ad in? (and how on earth did you find it in the first place???)

That was actually a pretty common approach at the time for small cottage-industry manufacturers to try pushing their wares - lot cheaper than a real ad! But it does show that Electromat didn't have too much capital behind it...

Don
 
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