SlotForum banner
1 - 20 of 108 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 60s and 70s saw an incredible variety of slot cars and similar toys coming out of Hong Kong. Most of what we identify with HK are the very toy-like 1/43 and 1/32 models, but Hong Kong manufacturers also did two Cox models (different versions of the Lola T70 - see TSR's posting in this section) and various others.

I thought it would be interesting to collate all these models and see what more we can find out. I'll start the ball rolling with a couple recent additions, by a company called PMC product, a fairly common Aston Martin DB5, and a very rare (to my knowledge) Renault Floride. More to come as I find time, and all contributions welcome, including those HK models that are statics, but could have been slot cars, and maybe shared the same bodies....

Don











And a trio of Marx cars, the first from the 1930, made in the USA, and the other two made in Hong Kong, probably in the early 60s...



 

·
Jim Moyes
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
I have found many 1/32ish Hong Kong made plastic friction toys over the years, Don, and converted most of them into slot cars, but I have no idea if they were ever produced as slot cars by the makers. They seem to be mostly 70/80s subject matter so not as early as the ones you show.

Is that the sort of thing you want on this thread?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, that would be fine Mr. M, and very much in line with what I want to show on the thread! I would opt more for the 70s stuff, since the 80s is too recent for an old phart like me, but I'm probably just showing my age...

I'm not sure how many of those were actually shared slot/static/toy bodies, but I figured this would be a good way to find out!

Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
I can contribute two brands, Luck and Art form. Luck used an L in a horseshoe as its emblem. Its no. 3024 was a 1/32 scale Ferrari P4 with a lift-up rear engine cover over a mock V12. I think it had a front-mounted friction motor bit I seem to have stripped that when I used the wheels for something else. The scale is reasonable but the shape is less than perfect. Coloured yellow and garish red.
Art form also made friction-motor cars, including an F1 Lotus Climax in about 1/28 scale. A good green but the wheels are very ugly. A two-part body split on the axle line.
They never made my photo albums but I may take a couple of shots in the next day or two.
 

·
Jim Moyes
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
Most of the ones I have are Luck(y) with the same brand mark that Rob mentions. Certainly some Jaguar XJ12 Coupes, a Range Rover Motorway Patrol and a Mercedes 508 "Paddy Wagon". I also have an Opel GT that I am fairly sure was Lucky, but I replaced the entire underpan with a slot car one so can't now be certain.

I also have Fiat 131 Abarths from an HK company called EUTA and a Mk2 Golf GTi which again I have discarded the base of. I thought I had some pictures too, but can't seem to find them, so I will have to get MrsM to fire up the Box Brownie. I did find pictures of the Ferrari 250 with the hinged rear end mentioned on another thread, so I can add those.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here are a couple pages from the catalog I mentioned earlier, which turns out to be the 1983 HongKong Toys catalog.... First, my all time favorite ad - and one of the reasons I'm a well-paid translator!



Next, a random page from the catalog, this time for HO. It's a 450 page catalog, and probably has 20 or 30 pages with slot stuff, mostly 1/43 and HO - don't remember any 1/32 offhand, but this was really a low point in world 1/32 slot racing...



Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Another Hong Kong brand, Lincoln High-Rev, produced toy slot cars in the 1960s in about 1/34 scale, slightly smaller than Scalex FJ or VIP cars. I have a 4cyl Lotus (a 21, sort of) with a single peg guide and pick-ups fixed to the underpan. It has a small can motor and a sound-effect system operated by a cam on the front of the motor.
The brand name is on the blister pack but not the car. Shape is disproportionately high and unsuitable as a replica.
The Art Form Lotus I mentioned earlier is a 25.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
Jeez. I cant belive how big the motors are in relation to the size of the little aston and the renault. Talk about "power to weight", no room for the interior then? But the little has renault has character(in my eyes) anyway. Matt.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Here are a couple more products from the British Crown Colony, now part of China again of course.

As mentioned above, one of the big manufacturers was Lincoln International, with their "High-Rev" brand. Here's a go-kart set, a very compact and undoubtedly cheap set, and a sort of F1 car mint on card.







Another roughly 1/40 scale car, this time a more recognizable Lotus F1; no brand marked, but maybe Lincoln or Speed King, another well known HK brand. These pickups are very typical of a lot of the HK products of the time, the same type is used on the Speed King /32 cars.
(PS: Rob, just reread your post and this must be the Lindon High-Rev car you're referring to!)




Moving to the larger scale, rather unusually for Hong Kong, here's a 1/24 Lotus 30 by OK Kader - the only company that made fairly "serious" slot cars. Unfortunately, not in good condition - anybody got one of the big OK Kader's in better condition to show, maybe with a box? That's a suspended chassis by the way, kind of like the Tamiya suspension setup.




And here are a couple static productions, in 1/32, by a company called Roxy Toys.





Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,490 Posts
Don
I thought this was Hong Kong made but it it not. I have a battery power toy Lotus 30 made by Jouets Mont Blanc in France. It has a sticker "YACCO' l huile des records du monde . The body is marked underneath Strombecker Corporation! Have you come across this. I was thinking that after the slot car boom many slotcars were converted into battery toys?
I hope Iam not hijacking your thread since this has nothing to do with Hong Kong.
Regards Allan
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Funny you should mention that Allan! As I was doing the photos I ran across the ones I had taken of the Strombecker/Mont Blanc cars and almost added them, just because it seems related somehow. We've gone into this on other threads (mostly in France I think) in greater detail, but Strombecker and Mont Blanc were partners in France, and they seem to have used surplus slot bodies for their friction toys, and a few of these battery powered models that went on some sort of slot track. Strombecker mostly sourced stuff from Japan, but I wonder if their later cheapo 1/32 cars weren't made in Hong Kong or China? (the ones with everything clipped in, and no chassis).







Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
Mornin
Don.....I noticed your post about HK cars and a few weeks ago i posted
about two D Jaguars i had gotten in a box along with other items. I took
it apart last night to see what was inside and the motor has a small oval
with something written in it which i cannot read and below that is HK-56
stamped on the motor. Notice the pully's on the rear axle and motor shaft,
it's a belt driven car, have you seen other's that are belt driven?. CG

 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good timing Gramps - I was about to get to these!

Your D-Jag was made by another Hong Kong company, Speed King, which did a pretty wide range of more or less 1/32 cars. I've got the D-Jag with a belt drive system, unmarked, and also a Ferrari 246 with an idler gear setup, but the same little Kako motor, that has the Speed King name engraved on the bottom. Offhand, I remember that they did an Aston Martin, and probably a couple F1 cars - but can't seem to find them for now! I'll post some photos when I do...

Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Yes, Don. Your little green Lotus is the Lincoln High-Rev. Mine is blue. Looks like your Roxys had friction motors.
If my first pic post works, it'll show the innards of the Lincoln Lotus. The thin brass arm pivots onto the cam at the front of the motor and touches a little resonator box for the sound. It's a non-starter at present but I vaguely remember it did make an extra noise.
At the top are the friction-motored cars I mentioned before, the Art Form Lotus and the Luck P4.
Rob
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
I have a few motors similar to the strange one above that Don identified as a Kako. Mine are stamped JEI H.K.-52. They have a longer shaft (55mm) and lack the lip between the two halves of the case. I had one or two ideas but don't think I ever did anything with them. The shaft is too short for 4WD except, I suppose, in a Mini. And I suspect they're not very powerful - anyone know?
Rob
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
10,017 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi Rob,

Any chance of seeing a picture?

These were very common hobby/toy motors in the 50s/60s, and I've seen the Kako brand, but I'm sure others made the same general type as well. They were generally made for operation on 3V, so used with batteries. No, not very powerful, but they go very well on 12V - just not for long! I assume most of these early HK and other sets were made to run on batteries, either 3V or maybe 6V.

Strombecker made a long shaft version for some of their earliest 1/32 cars, before switching to the better known Mabuchi 15R motor.

Don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Yes, Don; I'll take a pic and send it one way or another. I opened my first album in the gallery earlier today and put a few other pics in it, but my first attempt to use one ran into the "dynamic" thingammy problem that seems to have bugged others in the past. I'll sort out something but it may take a day or two.
Rob
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Postscript: Thanks for the interesting information on the motor, Don. The low voltage part does ring a bell. I think I ran one briefly on 12V but forget the details.
Rob
 
1 - 20 of 108 Posts
Top