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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a moment of madness....several moments of madness actually, I created a wooden chassis to go under a resin Ferrari 166 body.
The car works well with wheels and tires by Racer, motor by Ninco and other mechanicals by Slotit.
Initially the light body(14 grams painted) and the light chassis made for an indifferent performance but after fitting the Racer wheels and tires the car improved.
The rubber tires giving more grip and more drive though the corners.






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That's amazing that is, how many lollies did you have to eat to get all the sticks?. No but seriously you have talent to do that, its very impressive.
 

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Nice job Munt, but, using Oilite bushings is kinda cheating in a Popsicle stick chassis. The whole concept when I built the first one was the absurd simplicity of using the wood itself as the bearing surface.

Apart from the fact that bronze bushings will wear out way quicker than using the wood as a bearing. My original Popsicle stick MKI chassis is still going strong, after much abuse, and, at least two proxies since about 1996. After many hard miles of running (it has a 30 plus K Cheetah motor in it), it shows absolutely no wear at all on the wooden rear axle bearings (just holes drilled through the Lolly stix). Most of my bronze bushed cars with similar mileage have had their bushings replaced several times now.

I have yet to see any wear on any of my wood chassis.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Al, I thought that no bushings would be rather crude but I guess once the wood had burnished/polished itself then a nice axle bearing surface is possible.

QUOTE whose body is it?
Rixvette from the US aka Richard Gondeck.
He has recently moulded some neat bodies including 356 Coupe, Merc 300sl, Aston DBR1

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That is fantastic, I've seen all the metal bases and thought there was no way I could do that but the wood one is brilliant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE I could do that you could.

I thought a wood glue would(?) work well but in the end superglue was quick and strong.
The glue wicked into the wood and made strong joints.
I used some epoxy for perceived extra strength around the rear drive area.
Just cut accurately and squirt carefully.

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Brilliant job, and yes that colour looks really great too!

I wonder how a solid wood, possibly carved, chassis would behave? If it were a little heavier and stable perhaps more performance could be gained. I'd start one, but I still have to build a track to test drive on, haha!
 
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