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Each of us has his own taste regarding slot cars, and in my case I'm often more attracted by an interesting chassis rather than a very detailed body. Along the years I have collected a number of aftermarket chassis that never were part of a production car: I built the up, and paired them with suitable vac bodies to make complete cars. Most of these chassis aren't very well engeeniered, to say the least, but, anyway, I find all of them interesting as a variety of different, more or less successful, proposals in order to get a car going fast. Nevertheless, yesterday I was given an aftermarket chassis so badly designed that probably is not worth having a body. The brand is Telco, from Fresno, California. I have never heard about before, but according the leaflet they also made (or just sold) rims, gears and guides.

The chassis came to me mint bagged

49030287872_f691aa2f22_z.jpg

and my first surprise was that the bag just contained a few pieces of brass tube, some tube joints and a guide mounting. I opened the bag and readed the instructions just to learn that once build up the chassis would look like this:

49030287277_00a08fd906_z.jpg

Clearly the unusual pure U shape of the chassis will not do very much for rigidity once the parts have been soldered, but the major point is that, apparently, there is no way of attaching a motor. I continued reading the leaflet and, indeed there is one. In their own words,

"Place desired motor between tubing (...) use plastic electrical tape and tape across entire section of motor until rigid."

I will make no further comments. Just including a copy of the leaflet for if someone doesn't belive me (which I would very well underestand). Look at the graphic!

49029564173_c684b50466_z.jpg

Eduardo
 

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If it was a dollar forty nine today you'd think you'd been had over ,so back then you really had been screwed over,and to top it off you have to buy your own tape
 

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per the instructions, "DESIGNED to take. . (said motors)". Yeah, I guess tape mounting is a very "flexible" design to accomodate just about anything!! I have seen some Cox frames wherein tape was used in place of a missing motor clip. I wonder if these guys started this venture when turned away from employment from their neighbor; I think Kemtron was just down the street a bit!
 

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Alan Wilkinson
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Eduardo,
Seems like this antique Wilson motor is the one for this chassis.
Instructions say to "notch" the corners and it seems like the motor fits in, tilted 45 degrees.
You could use epoxy instead of tape to make it look less shoddy than the tape.
I don't think this solution will give a low centre of gravity! 😀
There must be a nonesense body made for this nonesense chassis🤓
Alan
 

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Brass tudes?.. ¿Que extrano, Eduardo? ;) I don't believe that it would be an effective chassis. Though I can easily imagine it being used for a model kit conversion project..
 

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Eddie Grice
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Mid 1960's twin motor Microperm powered slotcars were popular with some of the southern UK clubs. These were secured to brass tube chassis rails with cellotape. Very competitive at the time with rewound armatures and braking gears.
Eddie
 

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Alan Wilkinson
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Ahh, I think i see what "Telco Co." were trying to achieve with this chassis. 🕵
In 1967, the lotus 49 was the first car to use the engine as a stressed part of the design.🤓
The engine was no longer loaded into a rolling chassis but became a crucial part of the whole support structure.

Using a Wilson motor (photo above) with the end plates "notched" as suggested, the motor forms part of the structural integrity of the chassis, holding it all together and preventing twisting. ☝

This is so different to the modern slot chassis where the motors are indeed loaded into a rolling chassis (frame/plate /pod or whatever terminology you prefer)

Also, look how easy it will be to slide the motor forward or backward to adjust your front/rear balance!

Eduardo, if you can't get a Wilson vintage motor and mount, you might be able to fabricate a similar plate for a modern motor😀
Alan
 

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and there were a few vintage slotcars with stressed motors; the late Revell 1/32 brass frame cars come to mind. But no one would run those at an 8 lane commercial type with it's high speeds: all the stress from crashes being focused on the tiny self-tap screws holding the brass to the endbell. Really only suited for home or club type activity.
 

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Agreed the screws holding on the endbell were flimsy.
All the very many successful stressed motor slot cars I've seen fed the stresses through the can, and the endbell screws just fixed the endbell.

Stressed motors were common in faster anglewinder and sidewinder 1/32 cars from the late 60s and rather died out by the 1990s when much lighter cans came into use. Stressed motors were used over a shorter period in 1/24 raceway cars. The motor cans of the period were plenty robust enough to to take all the stresses from the axle tube soldered on the back to the main chassis soldered on to the front of the anglewinder / sidewinder motor's can. There were a few inlines built with stressed motors, but again they put the stresses through the can rather than loading the endbell screws.
 

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Alan Wilkinson
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Eduardo,
I see now what "Telco Co." Were trying to achieve with this chassis.

Way back, lotus released the lotus-49 formula 1 car.
It's main technical advantage was using the engine as a structural component (as opposed to lowering the engine tnto a rolling chassis)
At the time, This construction method was revolutionary.

"A stressed member engine is a vehicle engine used as an active structural element of the chassis to transmit forces and torques, ... The 1967 Lotus 49 is credited for establishing the solution"

Have a look at my sketch.
With a Wilson motor and the notches cut as suggested, the motor forms part of the chassis structure, preventing twisting.

I have never seen a slot car designed on this basis. All modern slot cars drop the motor into a rolling chassis/plate/pod.
I wonder if the date of the lotus 49 coincide with the date of this brass tube Chassis.

I'm sure that a better solution than "tape" can be found to create the solid box created by the frame tubes and the motor plates.
I would probably go for epoxy or even better, solder the plates into place.
If you can't find a Wilson motor, I'm sure it will be possible to fabricate a plate to carry a modern motor in the same way. Depends how badly you want to keep this authentic to the period.

Alan
 

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Mid 1960's twin motor Microperm powered slotcars were popular with some of the southern UK clubs. These were secured to brass tube chassis rails with cellotape. Very competitive at the time with rewound armatures and braking gears.
Eddie
Twin Microperm chassis in Area 5 tended to be sawn down cigar tubes, with the motors epoxied into the open ends. Then there was some rudimentary arrangement to attach a body on top.
 
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