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Hello again everyone, I find this forum very interesting and very helpful when wanting a problem solved.

My latest prob is that one of the screw holders on the top body on one of my Scalextric cars has 'threaded' meaning the metal fixing screw is slipping and not pulling the model together.

Does anyone know if there are any means of repairing the plastic thread?


As usual, thanks in advance.
 

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Martin De Ath
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Hi there Slotcar...

I know it sounds strange but I always use "Superglue"..

Take the car apart.. Put a small ammount of a "thick" superglue in the stripped hole, thread the metal screw down into the hole, and leave overnight..

Once the superglue has dried, you should be able to carefully undo the screw (just be carefull unscrewing it) and there will be a reusable thread in the plastic mount.
When putting it back together, try not to overtighten the mounting screws, especially the unstripped ones, they dont have to be mega tight.

I have used this method many times, and I have not (as yet) had a body screw "stuck" in the mount, try it and see..

I repaired two body mounts on my club NSR Mosler GT club car. That was about a year ago, and the body mounting screws still are holding ok, and I race the car hard.

All the best.. Martin De'Ath.
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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I would so not do that with superglue as it is going to have your screw permananetly stuck in the screwpost and undoing it is so likely to simply rip out your whole screwpost.

If the post is split down the side then simply sleeve it with styrene tubing (good model stores) but if the post is not split all you have to do is:

1. Internally wipe the post with a little 10-minute-dry epoxy resin (Araldite) using a piece of wire coated in the gloop.

2. Leave it to dry then try your screw (turning it in gently and undoing it a little every now and again to reduce pressure.

3. If it's still too loose then repeat process until you have a self-cut threaded grip.

4. Remove the screw for at least an hour to let the stuff set hard.

Another thing you could try is a length of electrical wire/cabling sleeving epoxied into the hole. Like an old bit of guide/motor wire with the copper pulled out, although you may need wire with a slightly bigger hole.
 

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Martin De Ath
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Hi there all..

Screwneck... Although I appreciate your views and solutions to this problem, I have repaired many stripped body/chassis mounting posts using this method..

If you try it, you will find that the metal screw does not get stuck in the mounting post, and as you start to unscrew it, withdrawing the screw remakes the thread in the post.
Just take your time when unscrewing it and you will find it works great, try it on an old body post or piece of plastic tubing..

I know it sounds strange to use "Superglue" and I was a bit unsure about it at first, but it does work. Epoxy resin does work, but I have found it not so strong.

I agree, if the post is split, then a sleeve to reinforce it would be the best way to go, but it still does not cure the stripped thread problem.

All the best.. Martin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
....As I said - I always find this forum so helpful - thanks guys, your comments are very much appreciated. I don't have superglue at the moment, but I do have epoxy so I'll try that right now, if it fails then I'll get me some superglue.

Thanks, Martin/Screwneck

Bill
 

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...Back on with update...I tried the epoxy resin stuff, I coated the inside of the mounting post, put the screw in for a few minutes, then unscrewed it back out and left it to set for 6 hours.
When I put the screw back in - then back out - the epoxy came out with the screw - must have done something wrong. I used that 'A/B' stuff that you mix equal amounts of, is that the right stuff, cos' it didn't work?

I like the idea of electrical wire sleeving epoxied in the hole, but I'll try the superglue method suggested by Martin and see how that goes.

Martin, in your post you say to use 'thick' superglue, I've always found superglue to be 'thin' and runny, is there a particular type I should use?

Thanks, Bill

PS: The post isn't split btw.
 

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Martin De Ath
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Hi there Bill..

Yes, there are various types of superglue. as you say there is the very thin/runny type and there is a thicker "Gel" type (I think Locktite makes a good version), try and use this type if you can., its a lot more controll'able.
I am sure you will be able to find something suitable at one of the big DIY sheds, or even supermarkets, but shop around as prices do vary.

The one I have ben using, is called "Gorilla Glue". I originally purchased a few bottles a while back while on special offer from Tesco's, but unfortunately although a very good superglue, seems to be hard to find now, so I guess I will have to find another make to take its place. I have used the Locktite "Gel" in the past and that is very good, although you do not get a lot in the bottle for the price.

Try it..... As you have found out, using Epoxy resin seems to stay quite soft, and pulls out when you try and unscrew the mounting screws, where as the Superglue method, seems to harden much more, so leaving a nice reausable thread, and after time, if it does go again, just repeat the process.

All the best.. Martin.
 

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I have repaired many cars with this problem... What I found works for me is to partially fill the stripped thread hole with ZapAGap, then use a needle or what ever you have lying around that is thinner than the screw to distribute the glue into the old threads and then leave it to dry... Or use Zap Kicker if you're in a hurry. Then simply put the car back together.

Many ways to skin a cat as you can see from the above posts.
 
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