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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have recently purchase some cars and I am in need of some front and rear tyres for them, is there a good place to purchase from? Any help would be appreciated. I assume there are different tyre sizes as when I was at my last meet Tony (SCHORC) use a gauge to measure tyres. And how much as these? Lots of questions
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Thanks for your time

Lee
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Diesel, I will be seeing Tony next week when we group for our monthly meet at Yelling. The track that I am running is Tomy AFX and I have a few different chassis Tomy, Tycos.

Hope this helps
 

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Hi Lee,

Some of the others will be able to give more information as they read this but from my experience, it all depends on how much you wish to spend.

For your racing cars, as opposed to fun cars to drive at home, then a good starting point is to switch the rear wheels to AJ 0.250 hubs. These are £1.50 a pair but if buying for lots of cars then it may be worth trying to haggle or looking to the States to buy. The advantage with these wheels is that they have an outer flange so they hold the tyre in place and also having a constant diameter rear wheels means you will always know what size your rear tyre is. Putting the same size tyre on the various rims of each manufacturer can stretch the tyre so you may not end up with the desired result as you move between cars. Some people also recommend using a vernier caliper to measure the tyre as with the consistent rim size, you'll always get an accurate result. I've seen non-digital ones in Poundland or digital for cheap on that well known auction site.

For a twisty track, a .418" silicone tyre will keep your mags low to the track which increases grip and due to the shorter straights you won't notice the trade off in straight line speed so much. A track with longer straights and sweeping bends will lend itself more to a .422 or .426 but obviously with a trade off in grip in the corners for the higher top speed on the straight.

Tony or SCD will both be able to supply basic replacement rubber tyres. They're cheaper for your home runners but won't be as much good for racing as a silicone tyre.

One thing I am going to with my cars where I have quite a lot is to prepare 4 - 8 rear axles with the AJ hubs for each manufacturer/chassis type (Tomy Turbo, Tomy SG+, LifeLike, Tyco etc) with the requisite silicone tyres and then swap the axles in and out as I want to race them. So if I have people round for a Nascar race, I'll put the axles in those cars or swap them into F1s for an F1 race. This should be a lot cheaper than trying to race prep every single car in my garage!

Hope that all helps a little bit, any questions let me know although as I say, some of the other guys know a lot more than I do!

Cheers

Gareth
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As always Gareth thank you for your information, I thought you didn't know much about this. Haa haa, I think my best bet would be to chat to Tony next Wednesday.

Thanks once again Gareth for your time.

Lee
 

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No worries Lee! It is one of the things I really love about the slot racing scene that everyone is so helpful and shares information. It has really helped me get up to speed in the last 6 or 7 months so I'm enjoying the opportunity to help others too.

And believe me, the bits I posted are the tip of the iceberg. Wait till you get into changing the tyre compounds, gear ratios and things like that! Then the allegedly cheap racing hobby starts becoming a bit more pricey!
 

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If we assume that a car is clean and fault free, and has a half decent armature, there is no more sure-fire way to find laptime than to always be on the 'right' tyres.

Gareth is spot on about the wheels. It is a fair bit of work fitting them to all your cars, especially as you will need to buy tools to do the job properly, but if you want to make sure you have the traction-magnet-to-rail distance where it needs to be to really push in a race, then this is where you start.

I would go for Supertires in the soft compound, in sizes .418, .422, .426, .430 and so on until you have 8 sizes. Maplins do a brilliant little box with 8 flip up lids that is ideal for storing tyres. By storing the tyres this way, and marking the lids. you can keep notes of what tyres are on which cars. Anorak central I know, but the key to doing better in races.

The last part of the puzzle regards measuring the tyre heights on the chosen wheels. If you only have the eight tyres above then it is not such a big deal to do this, but if you start using other makes then it is no longer enough to go by the manufacturers claimed size, since they would probably used a different wheel diameter for that size. Compounds differ too. For your own use all you want to know is the overall outside diameter of your wheel/tyre combo.

You could use a tyre gauge, but I don't trust them. You have to try and remember how much or little you pushed the tyre through a given hole, which of course you are not going to be able to do, so you end up with a precision tool that actually is only any good as a guide.

The beauty of the digital calipers is you will find other uses for them, so you could look at them as a freebie when it comes to tyre measurement. I'm not saying you have to do this stuff straight away, but if you work towards it over, say, six months, and always take the time at a meeting to try different heights during practice, I am pretty sure you will find it was worth it.

General rule of thumb with front tyres btw, generally the lower the outer diameter the better. BSRT make the best front tyre in my opinion, super low but stable, really enables you to set the shoes up very flat and of course you are getting more guide pin into the slot on any cars using them.
 

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As I say there is no need to get to that level yesterday, but don't buy tyres willy-nilly and certainly not without having a means to tell them apart. Changing the cars over to the same type of rear wheel can be done in stages too, so long as you know what wheel is on the converted cars you can always buy more at a later stage.
 
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