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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in the Midwestern United States and it gets very humid here in the summer. My track will be in the garage, which has some climate control, but is still going to be subject to more humidity than the house.

Many people seem to have their tracks in the basement or garage... humid environments.

Can people share any insights or tips on track maintenance in a humid environment? Is there anything one can put on the tracks to inhibit rust? WD-40?

Thanks,
Mike
 

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Aha...
I'm in the midst of a track replacement dilema and I haven't considered the corrosion factor seing as how I live so far inland.
However, plan 43B in the AC houshold involves a move to the coast once Ms AC retires and that suggests non-corrosive rails--ie stainless steel.
Ta Da!...Carrera...
...if I'm not mistaken...
 

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Interesting thread for me as I have just posted elsewhere on the forum that, living in the tropics, track rail corrosion is a factor for me. When the track is in regular use, I have no problem. When I work away from home for a month or more, I wipe a cotton pad soaked with light machine oil (sewing machine oil) along the rails before I pack the track away. I have considered using WD40 or other inhibiting type fluids, but I have found that light oil works for me and is easy to clean off before I use the track again.
Here is a hint: In hot weather and jumping about re-slotting cars...beware of sweat dripping on the track. The salty sweat is fatal for Scaley Classic. Dry it off immediately. Sounds daft? but true.

Is it just for cost that Scaley did not go for stainless for the Sport? I would have been happy to pay a bit extra to be relieved of the corrosion problem. (I had never heard of Carrerra when I bought my Scaley set on impulse, I was a "slot car = Scaley, Scaley = slot car" ignoramus at that time.)


Cheers, Isetta.
 

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There is also another way. Moisture can sometimes be a problem here in the almost tropics.

A large clear ( transparent) plastic sheet placed over a permanent layout will protect Scalextric from most of the dirt / moisture. The plastic sheet I have is the same light, but strong, recycled waterproof membrane material that is placed under concrete slabs to prevent moisture from passing up through the slab from rising damp.
No moisture has ever been seen underneath the cover here. When the old cover gets too dusty, I just get another new cover.

Stainless steel rails may well be a measured consideration for building a slot track system. But the Hornby track metal has performed as well as one could expect for so long now. They might change it but considering its performance here, I hope they just finish with the track, (after a re-do of the pitstop,) and get back to making cars.
 

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QUOTE (AussieCapri @ 13 Oct 2004, 15:48)Aha...
I'm in the midst of a track replacement dilema and I haven't considered the corrosion factor seing as how I live so far inland.
However, plan 43B in the AC houshold involves a move to the coast once Ms AC retires and that suggests non-corrosive rails--ie stainless steel.
Ta Da!...Carrera...
...if I'm not mistaken...
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi AC,
what about routed track with copper braid? Very low maintenance for same cost as plastic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Isetta @ 16 Oct 2004, 01:40)Interesting thread for me as I have just posted elsewhere on the forum that, living in the tropics, track rail corrosion is a factor for me. When the track is in regular use, I have no problem. When I work away from home for a month or more, I wipe a cotton pad soaked with light machine oil (sewing machine oil) along the rails before I pack the track away. I have considered using WD40 or other inhibiting type fluids, but I have found that light oil works for me and is easy to clean off before I use the track again.
Here is a hint: In hot weather and jumping about re-slotting cars...beware of sweat dripping on the track. The salty sweat is fatal for Scaley Classic. Dry it off immediately. Sounds daft? but true.

Is it just for cost that Scaley did not go for stainless for the Sport? I would have been happy to pay a bit extra to be relieved of the corrosion problem. (I had never heard of Carrerra when I bought my Scaley set on impulse, I was a "slot car = Scaley, Scaley = slot car" ignoramus at that time.)


Cheers, Isetta.
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes, I think maintenance is the key. I'm going to try WD-40 on a regular basis. It doesn't sound like a light oil inhibits conductivity to the car. The WD-40 should just evaporate and leave a very light protective layer.

And, as Isetta notes, sweat would be a killer. My garage location is usually pretty cool... even in summer. Though in summer cool = condensation of the water from the humid air.

That is one concern I have about the plastic covering. I intend on throwing a light plastic sheet over the track when not in use. I suppose, so long as the track location can breathe from underneath, that I wouldn't get condensation inside the plastic. I have had problems with condensation inside plastic sheeting before... so I'll have to keep an eye on it.

Thanks everyone. I'd appreciate any other thoughts, ideas, or experiences.


Mike
 

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1 hp Trabant is not my real car
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Triggy, yes I would really like to build a routed track. When I am semi retired instead of semi-semi retired, and get to spend more time at home, a routed track project is definately on the list. I am reading and learning from this forum ready for the day. I shall have to make it in "quick assembly-disassembly" sections as I have no room for a permanent track.
However, for now, I have to pack the track away in small boxes in the store room when I travel away from home for work - so plastic track is the best option - and generally I am happy with it because every time I build it up I try variations on the layout looking for the ideal.

Mike, my experience is very limited...but glad to share what little I know.

"per ardua ad slot knowledge"
Cheers, Isetta.
 

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I also live in midwest US and some simple care will go a long way.

First, as others suggested, covering the track will help alot.

The best thing one can do is have a stainless track (Artin & Carrera) which are a huge advantage to advoid corrosion but have sligthly less magnetic attraction than the steel power rails.

Some grease that conducts electricity (I think it is called di-electric grease) on the track connections will also help. This is important as to clean any corrosion the track will need to be taken apart.

Others have suggested light oil and this would work well when the track is dormant for extended times. WD-40 would work well because it displaces water, but I think light oil would be a bit better. With stainless steel rails I do not do this anymore.
 

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Here is an old model railroading trick from the States. Use Wahl brand (unknown other names from outside US) hair clipper oil. On nickel silver rails, significantly improves electrical pick up capability and reduces corrosion. Is also known to work for those folks who still use brass rail.

Normal usage is to put 1-2 small drops, each rail, about 20 feet apart or so. Then, run the trains.

Now, would this work on slot rails? Don't know, have not tried on my Sport track. (In the Midwest US, but the room is air conditioned/heated) I have used on my railroad, with good success. But, don't see any reason why it wouldn't work on slot track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
QUOTE (Peter_Gunn @ 29 Oct 2004, 13:53)Here is an old model railroading trick from the States. Use Wahl brand (unknown other names from outside US) hair clipper oil. On nickel silver rails, significantly improves electrical pick up capability and reduces corrosion.

Thanks Peter. I'll try that.
 
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