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Can you provide a photo of the bottom of the terminal tracks (one should do it, I assume they are both the same).

Slotforum is generally a good place to be for questions, no worries.
 

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That is... the negative from the power supply is basically wired to one rail.

The positive from the power supply goes to one side of the controller, and the post-resistor side of the controller goes to the other rail.

On a two wire setup, don't get too hung up on the "lane one pos & lane one neg (etc)" as depicted on the right side of the above diagram. Switch 'em and the cars run the other direction.
 

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Forget/ignore the bus board thing it was just part of the graphic I copy/pasted and should be ignored. Remember, the important thing is... the negative from the power supply is basically wired to one rail.The positive from the power supply goes to one side of the controller, and the post-resistor side of the controller goes to the other rail.
Look again at the graphic. Imagine one "power supply" --depicted by the large black and red wires on the left (presumably your wall wart transformer wires) wired to one of your lanes. Negative goes to a rail, positive goes through your controller and then to the other rail. Nothing is to touch the other lane's rails.

I think that is tyco track, and I think that the power pack plugs in on the right hand side of the terminal track. Typically two controllers and then the power pack on the right. That puts the spot that the power pack plugs in on your pictures on the "bottom" of the terminal tracks, correct?
 

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Slope Rectangle Electrical wiring Wood Map




Gas Electric blue Electrical wiring Door Machine


So, in each photo, I believe the negative does go to one rail, as depicted by the blue arrow.

Further, it looks to me like the positive from the power pack does go to one side of the controller, as depicted by the red arrow denoted "1". Annnnnnd the post-controller positive does in fact go to the other rail, as depicted by the red arrow "2".

Therefore, I would be suspect of the strips headed across the "inside" rails on their way to the "outside" rails in the top pic. Specifically, that they are touching those rails and creating your problem.

Perhaps un wire that one entirely and try only the setup on the bottom. Does that work correctly?

(disclaimer--I favor things mechanical, not electrical, and while I get by in this dept., it is not my specialty and, of course, may be incorrect)
 

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"Both terminal tracks must look like the one at the bottom of the first photo."--MM

Agreed, that would simplify things. Presumably the second terminal track would have to be turned around so that it powered the "other" lane.

I still would like to know what happens when the "top" (and possibly problematic) terminal track has the power removed completely. Does the other lane work?
 

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Have you ever removed the top terminal track to see what happens to the "inside" lane (ie, the bottom terminal track) when run by itself, please?

IF that works you could make a second identical piece and flip it around to power the other lane.

BUT, so far, your stuff looks like it should work and I do not understand why it does not. None of the posts give me a clear shot at why, or what else to do.

However, I confuse easy.
 

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Are we all to assume that your power supply is wired into the same two terminals as the original power pack?

Just because there may be too few inputs for Willy...have we checked across the controller terminals with an ohm meter to make sure they are not shorted full time?
 

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Tire Automotive tire Vehicle Automotive lighting Wood


MMs diagram is the same as the above. And he is correct, reverse the power to the bottom two pins and the direction of travel will reverse.

The deal is...the controller resistor goes between the pins denoted by the red arrows and should complete the circuit ONLY when you squeeze the trigger. It should have NO continuity--and NO power-- when the controller is released, and increase in power as you squeeze the trigger and resistance drops until you reach wide open, when it is close to nothing.

If the car is wide open when you plug in the controller, for some reason, the controller may be completing the circuit. Have you checked across the controller pins with the trigger released with an ohm meter (set to "ohms") to see if you have continuity? Seems like you do, and you shouldn't.

This is a set controller and has only two wires, correct?
 

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ps-"The power and controller can be interchanged if desired."--MM

That also is correct, of course, but nonetheless, the conclusions in post 36 remain the same.

Willy, please check the controller at your convenience & get back.
 

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ps--for giggles, before you make the new one you could test your "good" controller(s) with your earlier attempt, making sure that the strips do not contact the rails that they pass over (cardboard underneath?).
 

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I believe you are about there, my man. The answer was in plain sight all the time.

As has been mentioned, my bux down controller solution--

Input device Cable Font Gadget Wire


"Ideal" brand. It comes apart with screws. Of course, you will have to wire in your own plugs for your terminal track (preferably solder & shrink wrap). Typically they are available on Big Auction, including currently.
 

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Fooled me too, until I really thought through the path of electricity.

Often I have dug my own rabbit hole and then wasted time and money before I figured out how to climb out.

Once my brother had a 73 Trans Am. We were going to Daytona Speedway and I heard a front wheel bearing making a racket. He spent 15 minutes telling me it was the disc brake pads "fluttering"--and that they had been for months. Eventually there was a loud "clunk", followed by smoke billowing out the LF rallye II wheel. Before it was over I had to change a spindle behind a gas station near the track the next day.
 

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I prefer Parma resistor controllers, 60ohm. Some prefer 45s. I tried them, they were too touchy for me. The lower the number, the earlier in the "pull" the power comes on. Perhaps others are "faster" than me. The higher the voltage you run, the higher the number also, and I run 20.5v.

Pre MegaG+ sets also are generally 60ohm.

Now, to answer your question, set controllers have to be cheaply made, and they are. Really, a controller is made up of a wiper that is on a "dead" unpowered spot at rest, and as you pull the trigger, you are eliminating more and more of the resistor, hence sending more and more power to the car. At wide open, the resistor is effectively eliminated from the circuit.

SO, it comes down to the execution of the plastic housing, the quality of the resistor, and the quality of the trigger and it's mount and hinge and so forth. The Ideal controllers are incrementally--but significantly--more robust that the Tyco controllers that I used prior in the execution of all of those design details.

I do not have as much experience with the AFX controllers but believe that the Ideal controllers are superior to them as well. Additionally, all of the more recent AFX controllers are 120ohm. Good for their Mega G+ cars, at 22v. Neither of which I run.

Occasionally something goes wrong, perhaps the little return spring inside, and you need to get in there and fix it somehow. Tyco and AFX controller halves are glued together. And the plastic is pretty thin. So you are pretty close to ruining the thing just to get in there. Once repairs are made, do you glue it back together? I used to wind tape around the handle for the next access. But then, tape around your controller is not the most elegant solution, as far as solutions go.

The ideal controllers have small phillips head screws that make it easy to get in there.

So, to recap, I would suggest comparing the Parmas to Ideal controllers, cost wise. Understand that in either case, you are purchasing something that is outdated and out of production. Let cost and "value", and the level that you want to invest drive your decision.

Electronic controllers are the next step up. I am old school and prefer "simple" pretty much in all things, and they look more complex than a spool of wire on a porcelain rod. And resistor controllers can be wired either way to change the direction of travel. Important to me since I run a four lane figure 8 and that works out to one track runs opposite of the other, wiring wise. Others can provide a wealth of information on those if you like. Generally they cost more than the Parmas, which cost more than the Ideal controllers. As they say, "You pays your money and you picks your poison".
 

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" The [DC resistor controllers] have a switch that allows you to adjust resistance."--Cjtamu

Sounds interesting. How exactly do they accomplish that?
 

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I believe they have additional resistors wired in parallel. Much like a 2 lane highway that widens into four, as they are added, your net resistance drops. Sort of.
 
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