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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Anyone here actually try this?
 

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I have this set. I received it as a novelty gift for Christmas. It actually all works better than you'd think. My only gripe is the supplied cord is way too short, so you end up with an extension cord connection right by the track. The contacts are a bit fiddly, but manageable. My younger son got a hold of the cars and did a real number on them. I had to cannibalize both cars to make one that works. I just ordered this pack of two cars to bring the set back to a working condition.
 

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"My younger son got a hold of the cars and did a real number on them."--Cdub

Yep, First time, every time. Unsupervised kids these days can really fix stuff--to where it can't be fixed no more, lol. In 10 minutes.

Think of babies near a swimming pool...
 

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Very nifty!

Not 1:87. Im guessing maybe around 1:74 to 1:76 ... ish ?

Light and skittery. Lots of finger poken', prodding, deslots and fussing. Kinda typical of a platform where the mass has been whittled away to nuthen'.

Addressing the rail spacing was the first step to going over 1:72.

 

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Yo MM!

That diecast chassis is from a Aurora vibrator car -- the original Aurora HO slotcar and the predecessor to the 1963 Aurora Thunderjet 500. The bulbous midsection held the coil and the boss with the two screw holes was where the vibrator reed was fastened. It looks like somebody either had access to a supply of new old stock vibrator chassis or the original diecast tooling.

I recognize the chassis because I owned a bunch of them back in the day. That's how freakin' old I am!

Ed Bianchi
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire

That's so crazy! I thought that chassis was rather peculiar

How is the motor held in place??

Surely those must be new castings!? They look very shiny. What is the probability of a huge box of originals sitting around?

But why did someone reuse the molds?? Seems like they could have used a slimmer chassis design to allow for more body designs...

Is it expensive to make new molds??
 

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My Bad.

Giggle, of course it's peculiar. Its one of mine. Sorry for any confusion. If you watch the video in the OP completely, you get to see the Jupiter chassis revealed.

The Jupiter expose got me to thinking bout lessons learned. The "Vibrasaurus" was just one of my many 'speriments, where I've been there and done that, trying to push scale back the other way. It was whittled up with a few nips and tucks a decade or so back, from one of my really ancient Vibe chassis with a dead coil. Sports a torquey pager motor, a Tycopro crown, silis and braids. Obviously I'm easily entertained/distracted.

I tossed this mutation into this thread to emphasize that we were pretty close to H0 scale once upon a time (read: in the first place); coupled with the idea that to get a slot car to run or handle right, it has to have a sufficient amount of mass to keep it planted, either as a gravity or magna platform. Without mass, you simply have a chubby kite trying to fly.

Not all things move in a linear fashion when scaling up or down. Handling, feel, and track manners come under this umbrella. This changeling chassis is how I knew that the 3D H0 chassis would be far too light. They had to be slugged or "maggotized" in order to put some belly (down-force) in the beast. This conversion lightened the whole enchilada considerably by removing a copper wound, steel cored coil.

All that said, it outran all but my best Vibes, but in retrospect it coulda used some weight; probably right in near the middle, where the coil was in the first place. LMAO
***

CB:

Careful filing on my bastardized version produces a nice snap fit for the pager motor. It just clicks in. A zip tie would work too, if ya over cut it. The original coil on a vibe is pressed/peened into the alloy chassis on the bottom. It's very subtle. You have to remove the circuit board pick up plate to see it. I rewound a shorted coil once, because I'm kinda retarded that way.

BTW: The vibe chassis is part of the current path.

Still and all, actual H0 scale is at least ten points away. Conceivably built on piezo electric technology, and requiring the skills of a watchmaker to change a tire.
 

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That MM! What a card...

Right, so an old vibrator chassis pulled out of the scrap pile and re-motored. That makes perfect sense.

And you are not the only mentally-challenged slotter to rewind a vibrator chassis. Moi did that way back when. And I also salvaged wire off of vibrator coils to rewind T-jet arms, back before I started raiding Lafayette Electronics for quarter-pound spools of magnet wire. (Lafayette was gobbled up by Radio Shack long, long ago. I was in mourning. Now Radio Schlock is gone. How mortal we all are!)

I'd like to see some photos of the Micro Slot chassis.

On the subject of die-casting... Yes, die cast molds are pricey. But properly cared for they can stick around for decades. I would not be at all surprised to learn that the original Aurora molds are still extant, gathering dust on a shelf somewhere. Possibly in a warehouse reminiscent of the last scene of "Raiders of the Lost Ark". Finding the dang thing might be far more challenging than putting it back into production.
 

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Well Ed,

Ken and I agreed that it's probably a good thing we're not neighbors. I count you in that group of course. In the before time we had to make due with what you could beg, borrow, or steal. They call that re-purposing now. Working capital was scarce once upon a time too. Old habits die hard, I reckon.

Radio Shirk? HAR! I still have a working Realistic tuner.

If memory serves Tomy did a likeness of this platform about a decade ago. Came with a 240 Z and a Toyoya 2000 GT, without all the Lego foll-di-roll.
 

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It seems to me that there was a story titled "Raiders of the Lost Slots" or something like that about the search for lost Aurora tooling. I guess that I should have saved that story.
I actually miss Radio Shack. Radio Shack still exists as a mail order business, they still have a few stores and there is a network of associate stores that stock Radio Shack items.
 

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It seemed like they couldn't get to 1/84, and as close as they did get required that the cars looked "maggotized" (my favorite word of the day, MM!).

So, I welcomed the tyco pro for the additional realism, along with the more grown up underpinnings, and the rest have followed.

All that said, in this day of Dick Tracy video watches, it seems like it could be done properly.

Scale, though, is a funny thing. Most of my hot wheels type props are 1/64, and even then, I have a 1/84 car hauler that came with a 1/64 car on the back. Now has been appropriately refinished and has Fireball Roberts big '62 Pontiac on the back, also 1/84.

And then there is de train, boss, de train. 1/84. BUT, HO buildings are just too darn small, and the rest are generally "O" gauge (1/48), but with a twist. "Plasticville" and other "O" gauge builders hedged their bets by putting "S" scale --1/64 (!)--sized windows & doors in them. They reside on my layout.

Bottom line? I ain't worrying about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am buying one of these sets. I found it for about $25 on line. My son loves Lego so if the slot cars are a bust, he can use the race track to race Legos or make dioramas.

For Formula 1 Lego fans, check this out:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The set arrived, I can see why it failed, too much fiddling to get to run right and stuck halfway between genres.

When I first put the cars on the track, they didn't run!
I run an eraser on the track, the cars then went barely stuttering. I noticed the braided pickups are made solid by tin soldering. The front pickups work like the TycoPro 1 flap pickup not like braided Scalextric.

So with a tweezers, I bent them to be flat against the body. The cars now run ok. As someone stated before, they are too light.

Interestingly, it's rail track rather than extruded. But the spacing is such that it can only run their unique cars. So it alienates all other manufacturers.

Such an odd set. I think they should have went for mini figure scale which is 1/25, so 1/32 would work. For cars, I would include 1:32 "skateboards" with studded brick surface. Thus a kid or an adult could build a Lego car for mini-figures. Scalextric did sell Lego cars, so the concept isn't new.

Definitely do not pay more than $25.
 

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Cool! Nutten' like real intel.

Is the braid "tinned" ...

or is it actually "fouled" with solder?

A fixed conductor chassis has very little margin for error. The lighter the weight the worse it gets. Track surface inputs (noise) us transmitted directly to the current transfer point via the front wheels. A Non-isolated platform.

Tinned braid is stiffer and not really workable for a platform that doesnt have enough mass to plant it. A braid fouled with wicked solder below the lateral chassis line is junk. It defeats the idea of using a conductor that is flexible enough to be mashed under the weight of the chassis.



Naturally the life expectancy of braid on any knife edge rail is shortened. Combed braid, as seen above, works best.

Too bad your out of the box experience wasnt great. Maybe one could re-braid with a more flexible braid?

Bill
 

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There ya go Bob, great idea. Lean on it a little and see. Tape a coupla pennies around for some old school testing, and see what ya get. Like diecast they're zinc now too
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I think the braid is "fouled" with solder. It's saturated. If it was normal tinned braid, the knife edge rail would slice it. It functions as a more durable TycoPro 1 pickup.
 

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Sometimes if you heat solder up until it is shiny you can blow it out of the joint.

In my case, usually onto another uncovered body part.

At any rate, maybe it would remove some of the solder from the braids.
 
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