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DT
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TruSpeed has created and is about to release a NEW Ergonomic Handle to house his NEW range of controllers, an adjustable "SS Digital", the "Club" Transistor/Mosfet hybrid and the Racers' choice, the "PWM" now up-rated to 1/24th BSCRA standard. Most of these will be explained and demonstrated at the upcoming Orpington Swap meet (on Sunday the 20th November - see topic) and any questions as to how to get the best out of them, answered in person.

The whole NEW controller range will have a single to two-finger trigger option as standard, which is readily changeable without even removing it and an optional trigger spring tension adjustment that once installed can be altered externally. Both are to be available separately as they can fit similar styled handles or retro fit existing TruSpeed kit. The new TruSpeed handle which takes standard M2 nuts and bolts will be presented as alternative to the other market offerings. All units are covered by a two year limited warranty which is very generous and highlights TruSpeeds' confidence in their products.

The Adjustable SS Digital controller is in final development while the current standard upgrade model is still available. The new version having the ability to adjust settings without the need to go into the software offers far greater flexibility, always worth having, so TruSpeed is working on this and it will hopefully be available early in 2012.

A transistor controller by its nature will get quite hot and can suffer from signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking. By the inclusion of Mosfet technology in the Club Hybrid (MT MK1) these problems are ironed out, giving a cooler, smoother, more predictable response. A new feature is "Launch Control" off the line variable punch at the release of a button.

The PWM controller although conceived for 1/32nd scale now has upgrades that satisfy the power demands of the 1/24th scale racer for top performance motors, allowing the controller to be offered as a very affordable alternative to the high prices usually associated with these types of controllers and negating the need to have two controllers in your box for different scales. Extra options here as well as those previously mentioned are a trigger throw adjustment at the brake end and a belt clip adapter for the control box which is under development; this will allow more convenience.

Of course it is very difficult to replicate the extreme and exacting conditions of differing types of club racing circuits. So at Orpington test bed equipment will be used to show the net results to demonstrate and explain how the back EMF and bespoke electrical circuitry affect and influence the cars to achieve varying braking and power feed scenarios.

If you ever wondered how all this elastictrickery comes together to make these gadgets work, all will be revealed at Orpington! And - Bonus; It is all British Designed, Built and Serviced.

Web Site : www.truspeed.co.uk







 

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QUOTE (JEXY1 @ 14 Nov 2011, 09:40) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>A transistor controller by its nature will get quite hot and can suffer from signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking. By the inclusion of Mosfet technology in the Club Hybrid (MT MK1) these problems are ironed out, giving a cooler, smoother, more predictable response. A new feature is "Launch Control" off the line variable punch at the release of a button.
PICK UP PROBLEMS
Cars not picking up properly because of dirty / worn braids is a problem, what does this controller do that reduces the problem?

While it is true that some early transistorised controllers were more susceptible to pick up problems, all the new ones I've seen in the last 10 years or more are no more susceptible to pick up problems than a MOSFET switching type controller.

HEAT
Linear controllers produce just about the same amount of heat using either MOSFET or ordinary transistors.
Switching controllers will produce a lot less heat using ordinary transistors or MOSFETs.
The extra heat of a linear circuit isn't a problem as long as the controller is designed to deal with it (which all the leading brands are).

I'm not saying these aren't good controllers, just questioning if all the claims made for them stand up.
 

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Hi 300SLR,

I've noticed problems with braking and power loss with a whole spectrum of controllers (quite sadly I collect them) from standard barrel resistor through to the more sophisticated ones currently available.

Having used the earlier version and the prototype I've noted a marked improvement in less heat, better conductivity and no braking loss, I don't think you can eliminate them completely if you've only got a strand or two of braid left or someone has over oiled their car and it's contaminated the track/braid. I think you have to take it in context : will get "quite" hot and "can" suffer problems. I have several types of transistor controllers and depending on use they do get very hot as do most controllers of any type, by their nature and as a resistance. As to the amount of heat well I guess thats all relative, after all any cooling in any electrical component will lend to it's resilience and longevity.

You can't ask the man to give the game away I would think it is done by filtering and smoothing the power (within BSCRA rules if I remember the web site blurb on the higher end model), as this is aimed as a Club controller most probably will end up at a realistic price for it's market. Again in context : "inclusion" of Mosfet technology, which reading between the lines this is not the only component that goes into the mix to gain the results.

If you want more detail as per the press release you can ask him in person at Orpington, after all he designed, developed and manufactured this kit by racing and feedback from others.

Rusty
 

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Hi Rusty
We seem to be talking at cross purposes, I must have failed to explain my point clearly enough.

I don't doubt you have come across lots of controllers that have developed brake or power faults. I've seen quite a few of those faults being fixed at the local club.

Firstly what appears to be a claim of an advantage when the car has poor pick up. Good modern controllers all minimise this problem by doing what the laws of physics and many rule makers (including BSCRA) allow.
I'm not asking Truespeed to reveal their trade secrets. It's easy enough to measure the output of a controller, so once the controllers have been sold, anything which would help with bad pick up will be available to other controller designers.
Obviously we'd all expect a new controller to work better than examples of bad design or controllers in need of repair. Perhaps I've misunderstood what they were saying, which is why I was asking if they are claiming an advantage over other good modern controllers in this area. There are reasons to be sceptical that this is possible.

Yes of course you are right that the circuit cannot just consist of a MOSFET. Any electronic controller has more components than just the MOSFETs or ordinary transistors and all that circuitry is essential part of how well it all works. It looks rather like post #1 is using "transistor controller" to mean linear electronic circuits (the ones that produce a good deal of heat). There are two fundamentally different sorts of controller design. The linear type and the switching type Truespeed are using (PWM is one type of switching) which produces very little heat. The press release's use of "transistor controller" just to mean the first type is unfortunate as both types use transistors.

I am not available for Orpington, so I think its fair enough to ask the questions here.
 

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Greg Gaub
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Another high quality Scalextric Sport Digital controller? Excellent! Plus with the extra resistors for InCar-Pro chips? Even better?
I hope I'm not wrong.
 

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Hi 300SLR

I am beginning to think we are talking about different articles. I don't see any comparison or claim as such, only a generalisation to type and a pretty clear account of which direction the development had/has gone and what it seeks to achieve.

I've raced on a variety of tracks in the last few years and have noted and experienced controllers exhibiting strange behaviour on the car they were handling, some can be put down to driver error others to lack of maintenance but undoubtedly others were braid and track issues, always a difficult call.

So, an advantage remains to be seen and proven by competitive use. I (as expressed earlier) am convinced that it is a good controller that at a reasonable price will find favour with the club racer. For me it does the job, I can't compare it to what you have used (seems like quite a few) or experienced but unless your scepticism is based only on the bounds of physics I am sure we would like to hear about it.

With your last question I'll check it out and come back to you. It is a shame that you can't make it to Orpington it would have been interesting.

Rusty
 

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Hi slotbutton,

Sure your enthusiasm will be appreciated, thanks.

Haven't tried the new PWM yet, I was having fun with the old one until some persuasive chap convinced me his need was greater than mine and I reluctantly parted with it, just awaiting delivery of my next one. The only difference quoted is increased power tolerance, new body and trigger(s) as press release but TruSpeed is that progressive that you never know!


I discussed upgrades for PWM they are possible but might be cost prohibitive for a while. Best to drop TruSpeed an email off the web site and inquire.

Rusty
 

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Hi MrFlippant,

Yep, I totally agree with quality comment and it will be so sweeet in the new body.

The direction is hardware based but as I am mainly analogue man at the moment I will find out if InCar-Pro is in the picture and get back to you.

Rusty
 

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QUOTE (rusty_spring01 @ 15 Nov 2011, 06:02) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Hi 300SLR

I am beginning to think we are talking about different articles. I don't see any comparison or claim as such, only a generalisation to type and a pretty clear account of which direction the development had/has gone and what it seeks to achieve.

I've raced on a variety of tracks in the last few years and have noted and experienced controllers exhibiting strange behaviour on the car they were handling, some can be put down to driver error others to lack of maintenance but undoubtedly others were braid and track issues, always a difficult call.

So, an advantage remains to be seen and proven by competitive use. I (as expressed earlier) am convinced that it is a good controller that at a reasonable price will find favour with the club racer.
Hi Rusty
Agreed those problems exist. Braid and track issues are best solved by attending to the braids and track, there's not a lot controllers can do about it and good modern controllers already do what can be done.

Agreed, as with any new product, it remains to be seen how well it compares with other products.

The press release says "A transistor controller by its nature will get quite hot and can suffer from signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking. By the inclusion of Mosfet technology in the Club Hybrid (MT MK1) these problems are ironed out"
I've read that as a claim that signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking is a problem with a transistor controller and TruSpeed's mosfe transistor technology has solved that problem. The question remains about this aspect of controller performance, are TruSpeed claiming that the new is any better than other good makes of transitorised controller?
 

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QUOTE (300SLR @ 15 Nov 2011, 08:47) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>The press release says "A transistor controller by its nature will get quite hot and can suffer from signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking. By the inclusion of Mosfet technology in the Club Hybrid (MT MK1) these problems are ironed out"
I've read that as a claim that signal starvation (dirty/worn braids, track) sending the wrong messages to the unit causing power loss, poor or no braking is a problem with a transistor controller and TruSpeed's mosfe transistor technology has solved that problem. The question remains about this aspect of controller performance, are TruSpeed claiming that the new is any better than other good makes of transitorised controller?

Hi 300SLR

TruSpeed is not claiming anything - I quote : Steve Hills (Owner/Designer) "It is not our policy to make such a claim there has never been a need to compare, our products stand on their own".

Nuff said - Rusty
 

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QUOTE (slotbutton @ 15 Nov 2011, 02:55) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>That looks great! How different is the new PWM to the old model? Is it possible to get an upgrade done?

Hi slotbutton

Well I was half right - you can upgrade the handle and trigger but thats it. The new version has been re worked in the control box to cope with the higher power so it complies to TruSpeeds own exacting specification. Outwardly other than the new handle configuration it will look the same as the previous model but you might find a discreet version revision number if you look close


Rusty
 

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QUOTE (MrFlippant @ 15 Nov 2011, 03:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Another high quality Scalextric Sport Digital controller? Excellent! Plus with the extra resistors for InCar-Pro chips? Even better?
I hope I'm not wrong.


Hi Greg,

Very interesting - we don't know, original spec. was to make a replacement for the SSD controller with some power curve/delivery option boards. The new model won't need the boards as it will be adjustable from the handle, giving the extra convenience. So depending how you program in the options you want it may work or possibly modded to suit. Let me your thoughts and if anyone else has had some experience on this it might be worth opening a new Topic in the Digital area.

Thanks - Rusty
 

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Rusty, I honestly don't expect In-Car Pro support, since I don't believe there are currently any powerbases that support In-Car Pro features without the use of a computer connection and SSDC, anyway.
But, if the engineers at TruSpeed would like to take a look at that information to see if the controller can be configured in some way to support In-Car Pro features, more information can be found at MIH's web site (he developed the In-Car Pro code): http://www.electricimages.co.nz/SSD_ChipUpgrade.ashx
Looking over the site, I'm unable to find any information on how to make a controller send the needed information to an appropriately updated powerbase anyway, so I guess the issue is moot at this point in time. I guess I was hoping for some "behind the scenes" development.


In any case, I like the look of the new controller. It appears to be the perfect middle-ground between a Parma style handle and a Professor Motor style handle. I look forward to one day trying one out.
 

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QUOTE (snurfen @ 26 Nov 2011, 23:22) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Any idea when the digital controller will be ready for sale? Fathre Christmas is looking a bit bewildered on what to drop in my toy sack this year, and this would fit the bill nicely ;o)
Hi snurfen,

Looks like early in the new year for the new handle due to stringent quality control and the quest to make a decent product a component has been refused. There are however still a few and I do mean 1 or 2 of the earlier digital models in the MB handle still up for grabs if Santa has problems he should stop off via the TruSpeed website. Thanks Rusty.
 

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QUOTE (MrFlippant @ 28 Nov 2011, 18:09) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Rusty, I honestly don't expect In-Car Pro support, since I don't believe there are currently any powerbases that support In-Car Pro features without the use of a computer connection and SSDC, anyway.
But, if the engineers at TruSpeed would like to take a look at that information to see if the controller can be configured in some way to support In-Car Pro features, more information can be found at MIH's web site (he developed the In-Car Pro code): http://www.electricimages.co.nz/SSD_ChipUpgrade.ashx
Looking over the site, I'm unable to find any information on how to make a controller send the needed information to an appropriately updated powerbase anyway, so I guess the issue is moot at this point in time. I guess I was hoping for some "behind the scenes" development.


In any case, I like the look of the new controller. It appears to be the perfect middle-ground between a Parma style handle and a Professor Motor style handle. I look forward to one day trying one out.

Hi MrFlippant, Thanks for that. As you have read in an earlier post we won't be able to try it until next year so there'll be no reports on how the analogue variable power response affects the mix for some time. Best, Rusty.
 

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Good to hear you guys take QA seriously. Will wait happily till you've got it to your satisfaction. (No idea how I missed your response, originally, but thanks for the reply).

I'll pop over to your site to nag you properly now
 
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