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Hi,

I'm looking at entering my first race that you supply your own car and I have a bunch of rules I need to adhere to.

I have a few questions and I'm hoping to get a few things cleared up, this is also my first race without magnets.

The rules stipulate that the motor, gears and wheels must be Slot.it.

There seem to be various options for all of the above all pertaining to weight, I fully understand the weight to power ratio being paramount for both speed, acceleration and handling. WhaI get confused by is that fact that 10g of extra weight can be added.

If I were to add weight I would surely want some of it to be directly over the rear wheels to give extra down-force and grip so why choose the lighter option for wheels and gears?

For example the Ally wheels weight 1.6g and the mag ones weight 1g saving .6g but as I stated, surely the extra weight over (or in) the wheels would help grip?

Which is the best pinion gear, Brass or one of the other options and why?

Suspension is allowed, how does this effect the car (its an Avant Slot R10), I guess this depends on the type of track, I assume its a wooden track but I will be checking.

I'm sure more questions will pop up but thank you in advance for any assistance.

Colin
 

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Lee Green
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1,995 Posts
No you do not want weight over the back as this creates a pendulum effect, you want weight just behind the guide too keep it in when possible over gripping... you may not even need it.

Ergal slot it pinions are best for slot it cars and which many of teeth depend on whatever track you are on.
 

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With the caveat that I know almost nothing about slot car racing...

Lighter wheels mean they're quicker to spin up, actually it's the inertia that's more important than the overall weight so a 1g wheel with all its weight at the centre will spin up faster than a 1g wheel with all its weight around the rim.

Generally you make the whole thing as light as possible, then you can add mass where you choose - just ahead of the rear axle, over the guide etc. You want the weight to be as low as possible for more secure cornering.

Now over to the guys who know what they're talking about!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Guys,

Thanks so far.

Flange, What are the Ergal gears made from (sounds stupid if you know the answer) ? The teeth are 9/26 for the race running on a Slot.it Boxer/2 motor. I'm seeing if the car I've chosen can be adapted to andlewider as I believe this is better than inline.

For the years I've been racing I should know this stuff but I've never raced a modded car beyond a faster motor as no one else will mod their cars that I race with.

Thanks
 

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Lee Green
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1,995 Posts
QUOTE (Wraith @ 8 May 2012, 20:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Guys,

Thanks so far.

Flange, What are the Ergal gears made from (sounds stupid if you know the answer) ? The teeth are 9/26 for the race running on a Slot.it Boxer/2 motor. I'm seeing if the car I've chosen can be adapted to andlewider as I believe this is better than inline.

For the years I've been racing I should know this stuff but I've never raced a modded car beyond a faster motor as no one else will mod their cars that I race with.

Thanks

Talk to zarko.... i invited him down to my club and told him an awful lot a bout slot it cars


ergal is a type of alloy metal

you want to true tyres down with the aid of a tyre truer really.... depends on if its plastic or wood...


If its a long track (has a long straight and is about 120 foot + i would say 12z pinion and about 28-30 gearing is nice usually
 

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Greg Gaub
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14,645 Posts
Mr.Flippant's guide to car tuning for the newbie ('cus he's one, too ;-)

1) get track time with your car ASAP. If you can't get there before race night, bring some basic tools and any parts/supplies you need.
2) Test the car with the basic required set up, e.g. appropriate parts, tires, any tire treatment, lubrication of moving parts, etc.
3) Tune.


Tuning all comes down to the best amount of grip versus sliding or rollover for any particular car or track. That's why track time is vital. Home tracks are great when the race track is the same, but otherwise, you're wasting your time on plastic if the race track is wood (or vice versa).

Once you get some track time, how does the car behave?
If it slides all over the place, then you need to INcrease grip. Do this first by getting some pod and/or body float (rock) according to what the rules allow. I'm betting loose screws as desired. So, loosen them a little and test again. A screwdriver at your driver station is a good idea. If you have tons of float and it still slides too much, check your tire prep. If that's good, then add weight. Weight at the sides and/or up high will encourage more body float and add weight to it to increase the grip on the outside wheel in turns.

If it chatters a lot, or rolls over in the turns, then you might have too much grip. First, tighten the pod and/or body screws. The stiffer the whole unit is, the more it will slide instead of roll. If a stiff body or pod is not enough, add some weight down low and on the center line like where a magnet would go. Slot.it even make a tungsten weight in the shape of a magnet.


The sweet spot is hard to find, but will come faster with practice/experience. I'm betting Flange and others will be able to share quite a bit of their experience.

Oh, and if the car likes to pop wheelies, or it just seems to hop out of the slot and drive straight into the wall, then you'll want a little weight up front if allowed. If not, look at ways of reducing grip, as too much grip can make it go up on two wheels and the guide just comes out of the slot. If you have spin control like on an SCP1, turn that up (the green knob). I often turn that up for slot.it and NSR cars.

Good luck!
 

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Adding or removing weight is another way of tuning the car's handling.
Tunings all about getting that car to work best on a particular track in particular track conditions.
Mr F is absolutely right about needing track time on the track to tune for THAT track.

In most cases it's best to try and tune other things before adding weight.
For example, if a car is tipping in corners it's often better to remove weight up high (if the rules allow) than add it down low.
The best way to learn about weight is to try it in various different places and see what happens both to lap times and the feel of the car. Track time on a race track is often limited, so you are unlikely to have time to try every combination of tweaks. It can save a lot of track time on a race track if you already know what different changes feel like.

QUOTE (Flange @ 8 May 2012, 20:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>No you do not want weight over the back as this creates a pendulum effect, you want weight just behind the guide too keep it in when possible over gripping... you may not even need it.
That is true for a lot of cars, but for some weight under the back axle is the best set up.
 

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Its not my event its a club event., and we would be please to see you Colin.
The rules for this event are on the mhsc website, I will have to read them myself, but thought it was for inline cars only, and for standard 9 26 gears and wheels of a set size.
Zen
 
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