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Thanks Rich. I true my rubber tires at 2.5-3.0V, my urethanes at 4.0V and my silicones at 5.0V on my Hudy. I never use more than an 0.3Amp current draw on the tire and have, so far, not melted or gooed one...……… I agree that silicone really loads up the drum on the Hudy; even using the banana stick frequently. Almost makes it so that you need a Hudy for rubber and urethane and another one for silicone.
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Allan
 

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With a properly prepared tire on a air hub, as LeMans 1960 has described, how long can one expect the benefits of the oil treatment to be apparent under racing conditions? How long before the oiled preparation effect wears off? For example, could one reasonably expect that the performance benefit would still be there after, say, 30,000 meters of racing on a smooth surface, flat track?

Also, what is the performance of the tire like once the oil preparation effect has worn off? Is it the same as an untreated rubber tire at that point or is it something less than that?

Allan
 

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Hi Everyone and thank you for the interesting thread. I live in a very arid country and the air is very dry. What can I use to "oil" the tyres? I have Carrera Evolution standard cars. I have access to a variety of chemicals, so I can make my own concoction if someone will be so kind as to share a few recipes please? :)
 

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Kevs Racing Bits
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3 in 1 oil - takes 12 hours for best effect

Tea Tree oil - takes as long as it takes to dry for best effect

The longer it takes for the additive to work best the longer the grip seems to last. So for these two, Tea Tree oil gives mega grip but doesn't last a 3 minute heat. Whereas 3 in 1 oil has a lasting effect and a quick clean with lighter fluid between heats if there's time will give them a boost.

...and the search function is all you need to find info on this subject over the (many) years
 

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Rich Dumas
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NSR sells a tire conditioner that you might try.

I was aware that some clubs have banned tire treatments of any sort, I was wondering how you would enforce that.

When we were still using rubber tires we found that a particular treatment might work well on one set of tires, but have little effect with the same tires from another batch. That problem tends to make it difficult to maintain a level playing field in a club racing setting.
 

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Expounding on Rich's post #80: does anyone use a skid pad to true or polish tires?
I'm not into the competition thing and have better things to do than true tires. I've wondered about making a figure 8 skid pad and gluing fine wet-and-dry sandpaper to the surface, then just letting the car run around for a while after I have done a rough true.
Comments?
 

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Somewhere on here , not necessarily in this thread, is a reference to a skid pan to profile the tires but I never got around to building one. I also did not race.
 

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I'm back again on the topic of longevity with regards to oil treatment of rubber tires. Four questions:

1. if rubber tires are oiled according to the method described in the OP, how long can one expect the treatment to last; how long will there be a noticeable performance benefit to the oiling process (improved traction)?

2. are there other oiling procedures that produce better or different results?

3. there is reference in the OP to "disasterous" effects if a tire is "over-oiled". What, exactly, constitutes over-oiling and what are the disasterous effects? I ask this one because it seems to me that the deeper the oil penetrates into the tire at the outset (the period when the tire is being oil-prepared), the longer it will last since I would expect that the centrifugal force on the tire during racing would cause some net out-flow of the oil; thinking of deeper oiling as creating an "oil resevoir" of sorts in the tire.

4. has anyone ever tried oiling while truing? Yes, I can get a wretched visual as I ask this question, but has anyone ever tried it - with good or bad results?

Allan
 

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From original post:

"Most people (including me) begin by thinking that more rubber on the track equals more grip. It doesn''t. You can see this with a simple experiment. Get yourself a school eraser. Place the eraser flat on the track, apply a small amount of pressure, and try to slide it. You'll find it moves quite easily. Now put the eraser on its edge. Apply the same pressure and you''ll find it's more difficult to move. This proves that less rubber on the track equals more grip."

I'm not a competitive racer - home racer only, and maybe I'm speaking out-of-turn, but the fallacy to the eraser analogy would seem to be Force = Pressure / Area ---- F=P/A or P=F*A. The flat part of the eraser has more area, so more force is required to create the same pressure that you feel when sliding a small vs. larger area. When applying the same "...small amount of pressure...to slide it..." for both the flat and on-edge part of the eraser, less force is required to move the flat eraser because the force is spread over more area.

The coefficient of friction is the same. If you apply the the same relative pressure to the same relative area - the force to move the eraser will be the same. So I would argue that less rubber on the track does NOT necessarily equal more grip. There's more to it than that.
 

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Alan Wilkinson
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I'm back again on the topic of longevity with regards to oil treatment of rubber tires. Four questions:

1. if rubber tires are oiled according to the method described in the OP, how long can one expect the treatment to last; how long will there be a noticeable performance benefit to the oiling process (improved traction)?

2. are there other oiling procedures that produce better or different results?

3. there is reference in the OP to "disasterous" effects if a tire is "over-oiled". What, exactly, constitutes over-oiling and what are the disasterous effects? I ask this one because it seems to me that the deeper the oil penetrates into the tire at the outset (the period when the tire is being oil-prepared), the longer it will last since I would expect that the centrifugal force on the tire during racing would cause some net out-flow of the oil; thinking of deeper oiling as creating an "oil resevoir" of sorts in the tire.

4. has anyone ever tried oiling while truing? Yes, I can get a wretched visual as I ask this question, but has anyone ever tried it - with good or bad results?

Allan
1. Until the depth of the tyre penetrated by the oil is worn away.
2. Oil is oil. Apply it, roll it, wipe it, allow it to dry.
3. Swelling of the tyre is the "disaster"
Note that by the time the tyre is on the track , it should be dry.
Many clubs prohibit any tyre that appears "wet" on track.
4. Lighter fuel is best applied during truing, oil during rollering.
Some tyre truers (nsr ) have a roller mechanism built in.

Alan W
 

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The idiot is the person who does not keep their tyres and track in good condition , just make sure tyres are round sit on the B wheel properly and prefebly glue and true , and guys just keep the track clean of the gunge and marbles, makes a lot of differance you know.
 

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1. Until the depth of the tyre penetrated by the oil is worn away.
2. Oil is oil. Apply it, roll it, wipe it, allow it to dry.
3. Swelling of the tyre is the "disaster"
Note that by the time the tyre is on the track , it should be dry.
Many clubs prohibit any tyre that appears "wet" on track.
4. Lighter fuel is best applied during truing, oil during rollering.
Some tyre truers (nsr ) have a roller mechanism built in.

Alan W
Thank you for those answers, Alan.

I'm not familiar with "rollering" - how is it done? Is it a reference to having the tire spinning while applying oil or does it involve having the tire spinning while in contact with a surface, like a roller?

With lighter fluid, if applied during truing, can the tires gum without much warning to the point where you have ruined the surface? I assume that you are using a very fine grit paper when you apply the lighter fluid, otherwise I would expect that you would end up with a lighter fluid-rubber amalgam on the surface, which I would think would not be beneficial.

Allan
 

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Alan Wilkinson
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Allan,

The rule with truing is GO SLOW!
If you create heat, the tyres will inevitably turn to mush.

Rollering refers to the process of rolling one oiled tyre against another.
The process can be done by hand but some truer units (nsr type) have a rollering axle for this purpose.

Alan W
 
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