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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I've either mis-read something, or mis-understood it. This is my understanding as it stands:-

Silicon tyres leave deposits on the track and rubber tyres won't grip as effectively. Therefore if you're going to run silicon, all cars used on the track have to have silicon or they'll be off at every turn.

Urethane tyres grip in a similar fashion to silicon, but they don't leave slippery deposits so running them doesn't cause problems for rubber-shod cars.

As the above is what I understood, I binned my silicon tyres, cleaned the track and bought urethane.

Recently I've been having a problem with my SCX Porsche, and to a lesser extent the SCX Morgan as well. The standard tyres have been picking up deposits after less than 20 laps and need very regular cleaning - a 30+ lap race is a waste of time as beyond that the car will go off more and more until the tyres are cleaned.

I've got 2 new (to me) cars that have NSR Supergrip tyres and don't suffer the problem I'm trying to describe.

Today, I cleaned the track again and ran the SCX cars before any of the others. 50 laps and the tyres barely needed cleaning. I then ran the cars that have the Supergrips on for a while. I did the gaffer tape trick on the SCX cars and ran them again. Same scenario, 50 laps and hardly a speck on the tyres. Then I ran the cars with the urethanes on.......................

After that, I ran the SCX cars again and, you guessed it, 20 laps and they're all over the track and there's bits all over the tyres.


Now I've decided to bin the urethanes, it's occurred to me that maybe they're not suited to my mixture of Sport and classic track. So, which tyres do you all recommend me to use on my track??? The Supergrips seem fairly good, as do the SCX ones. I've got another 3 Scalextric cars of varying ages all with what look to be the original tyres on and these tyres have seen better days so I'm looking to replace them. But what with???

TIA
Stuart.
 

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Mike
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put sticky tape , sticky side up at a spot on the track and all tyres will be cleaned for at least race duration
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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You don't say what eurethanes you are running? We have fount similar problems with one brand of eurethane tyres here and no longer use them. We find on our routed tracks that NSR, Slot It, Scalex etc rubber true all work well with each other.
But we are running on a rubbered up routed track.
 

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Slot Car Racer and Builder
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silicone tyres don't leave a deposit on the track - there doesn't seem to be a huge issue with running urethanes and 'rubber' tyres on the same track - it seems the practice not to mix rubber and silicones.

rubber tyres and to some extent urethane tyres do leave a deposit on the track 'rubbered up'. The general consensus is that Silicone tyres remove this rubber thus making the grip poorer for cars with rubber tyres.

silicone tyres seem to work best on a clean dust free surface (they pick up the dust real quick) for routed tracks those painted with gloss paint seem to offer the best grip.

In general I try to stick with a similar type of tyre on all my cars - ie all silicone or all urethane etc - I get good results out NSR tyres I find with a light rub of oil they are quite grippy.

cheers
DM
 

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We've discussed these comparisons quite a bit in the past. I'm tempted to point out that "urethane" (which is actually polyurethane, urethane/carbamate is different and a component material in PU) is a family of compounds, not a discrete material. Also that very often other urethanes and/or other synthetic rubbers are usually mixed in with "urethane" to modify the properties of the product.

It's fair to compare a home-molded tire from a known compound, or even tires of a specific manufacturer...but it can drive you nuts if you start generalizing from one "urethane" compound (or silicone or "rubber") to the whole class of compounds. That being said, trying out various products to find one that suits your track and driving needs makes a lot of sense. I'm glad you found something that works for you...and thanks for sharing those results. I'm sure others will find your results helpful.

John
 

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John,

What are neoprene tyres? Is that another term for sponge?
 

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Slot Car Racer and Builder
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Isn't neoprene the stuff they make wetsuits and mouse mats out off. So maybe neoprene tyres are sponge.

DM
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for the input.
I think I may have made an elementary mistake.


I had been running a pair of the "offending" tyres on the front of one particular car, and checking it the other day, they had obvious scuffing, whereas none of the ones on the rear of any of the cars did. My suspicion is that the particles that scuffed off these two tyres were the cause of my problem. I still won't be putting any of the 4 pairs of urethanes back on the track, though.

I have to agree with the person who suggested that it's best to stick with one type of tyres, where possible. Apart from the secondhand Scalextric cars (which I'll only be getting another couple of) all my cars will be running their standard tyres. I think I've now settled on Slot.it Z0 fronts and P2 rears for the cars I run aftermarket tyres on.
 

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Stranger Things 2
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Hi, for what it's worth I've been running urethaines made by Paulg on the rears of a lot of my cars for sometime now and have never experienced any problems with residue being left on any tracks I run on. Also I've never found that using these urethaine tyres has caused any loss of grip for any of the still rubber shod cars that I and the other guys run.

BTW, I've found from experience that as little grip as possible is actually the best for the front tyres on slot cars ... so your old, low grip tyres are best for this.

Cheers, Michael
 

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Phil Kalbfell
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We have found that Ortmans seem to be the worst offender in regard to effecting the grip of rubber tyres. The MJK and local ones do not seem to cause the problem as much.It also probably depends on what track surface you are running on.
 

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About the neoprene questions...neoprene is a synthetic rubber, different composition and normally a "solid" like the others. Any synthetic rubber can be made into sponge by creating gas bubbles in it.

Also, one of the nice things about PaulG's compound is that a light scuffing with 320 grit sandpaper (just like truing, but only to scuff them up, not reshape etc) causes them to perform nicely, both grippy and yet with a predictable slide.

John
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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Definitely seems to be a case of different compounds suit different tracks and, perhaps importantly, different driving styles.

I tried sili tyres on my Scaley Sport track, and while they worked well they required way too much cleaning of both tyre and track for my liking.

I've found best success with a variety of different urethane compounds. MJKs are favoured because they're readily available for a range of wheel sizes, but I've also run a few 'homebrewed' concoctions with varied success. Slot.it P6s hook up pretty well. Mr DangerMouse's Shore 40 homebrews were really good, but someone elses Shore 40 homebrews were better. And then I discovered a crazy guy in the States that seems to use slot car tyres instead of packing peanuts or bubble wrap for shipping cars.


Of OEM tyres, only my Ninco 4WD rally cars are running their original 'rubber'. They are untreated and are great. But I think this is a case of the tyre suiting the driving style as much as the tyre suiting the track. My Ninco GT cars are much happier on MJKs.

The one that I've been surprised with has been the Racer tyres. I put Racer wheels and tyres on my Ninco XK120. With a little truing they were quite good. With age and continued running they continue to improve. But I wouldn't want them on everything.
 

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OK, an interesting discussion.
So here is a "novice" question for the benefit of me and others...

How do you determine the correct "size" of tires/tyres for, say, a Scalextric car, if looking for replacement OR Scalextric brand tires/tyres?

Most spec sheets for Scalextric cars give part numbers rather than sizes/specs.

Thanks.
Cheers!
 

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Its interesting that Ortman's have been quoted as causing some of these problems as they seem to be about the only way to go for old scalextric cars.
Are there other tyres out there for these old cars that I don't know about?
Cheers
Andi
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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QUOTE (sealevel @ 2 Jun 2011, 14:36) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>How do you determine the correct "size" of tires/tyres for, say, a Scalextric car, if looking for replacement OR Scalextric brand tires/tyres?

Most spec sheets for Scalextric cars give part numbers rather than sizes/specs.
Get yourself a set of vernier calipers and measure the overall diameter of the tyre and measure up the rim.

Best detailing I've seen on tyre sizes is by MJK. They list theirs by rim diameter, step/shoulder width, tyre width etc as well as what car model it was made for. This makes it particularly easy to match existing tyres to something different.

Most other tyre manufacturers list tyre sizes only by rim diameter (in mm) and tyre width.

I do wish they'd give an idea of tyre wall/profile height.

The further you dig, the more you find there is to learn.

Embs
 

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QUOTE (conti_rowland @ 2 Jun 2011, 06:28) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Its interesting that Ortman's have been quoted as causing some of these problems as they seem to be about the only way to go for old scalextric cars.
Are there other tyres out there for these old cars that I don't know about?
Cheers
Andi
When you say old do you mean really old. I've just replaced the tyes on my 25 year old F1, Porsche & SuperStox - they were all the same size. The tyres fitted perfectly and are very soft rubber and really transformed the cars but I haven't had time to test deposits etc Link. The post to Europe was very cheap and there's a good reference system & choice of hi grip or max grip. Just type in the model number.
 

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It's about time companies came up to the std. of MJK. Width x Tyre wall x ID. and add OD, hump, Type of car for good measure. if you like.
We were testing out some tyres last night. On a brand new Wood routed braided track. For Flexi cars. But want to run HB types. Tyres on offer. PaulG, Ortmanns, Slot, NSR, Yellow dog.
The ones that came out best. PaulG's on a Fly F40 Racing model. Next, NSR's. The rest, just could not hack the smooth surface of the track.
Remember, Flexis use Foam.
Also remember, tyres suit certain tracks as well as cars. What runs well on one type of surface with a car, may not on another surface. So if your only racing on one track, no problem. But if you race on a few different track. you need a good selection of different tyres.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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Interesting you mention that Saviour. I've only recently been running 1:32 cars on a friend's 1:24 flexi track. His track is semigloss and hasn't been gooped in a good 12 months. I found the NSR (Ultra?) tyres that are standard on the GT40 were pretty good. The Slot.it F22s were OK. And MJKs were passable. The best were a secret formula Urethane sent to me by an American friend (the formula is by a fellow Aussie).
 
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