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Alfie Noakes
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We've just bought one of these at work, so I'm looking forward to it arriving. It can also be used as a (limited) 3D scanner, which I'm excited about, as it opens up a world of duplicating forms, rather than generating them with 3D CAD software.
Cheers,
Richard
 

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Circuit Owner
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QUOTE (diesel @ 11 Oct 2011, 12:04) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>We've got an MDX-20 where I work. Been here for over a year and not sure if it's ever been used!

Well there you go - offer to take it home and get it working for them!!! Of course that might take a few months for you to properly "evaluate" it
 

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QUOTE (montoya1 @ 11 Oct 2011, 12:16) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I take this would not be up to making complete, durable bodies?

The MDX-20 will machine aluminium. How durable do you need it to be !?!

The tiny device in Doug's original post is too small for a slot car (unless it's 1:64).

The challenge with the bigger machine would be to accurately turn the machined piece over to remove the inside. The biggest challenge would be getting a lump of plastic that big!

It would make more sense to machine a master out of a suitable material and then make conventional silicon moulds to resin cast OR make master moulds for injection moulding. The prospect of making injection moulds is REALLY exciting - especially for the master scratchbuilders who struggle to get unit costs down (GP's DB4 Zagato as a super resistant makes me drool just thinking about it)
 

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Mr Mod - thanks for the clarification. I guess I was looking at HO bodies being printed in ABS straight from the machine, since the other routes involve another process after, with the requisite skill-set and investment of time and wonga.

Resin bodies very rarely cut it for me, they are 99% of the time too heavy and fragile to race properly in HO, and putting something that is meant to move on a shelf forever makes no sense to me.
 

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I have an MDX20 at work, great little machine! The 3D scanning attachment works with a sensitive probe (rather than a lazer) which 'feels' its way in a grid fashion to work out the 3D surface. You can set so it is very accurate but it will take along time.

I scanned a 1/24 model Smart Roadster and then scaled it down to 1/32 using the software provided and machined it out of cavity wall insulation foam which it can tackle fairly easily. The surface would still need some sanding and cleaning up. My idea was to make a mould from this and then cast it in resin. I haven't managed to finish it yet - it's work in progress

I used it to machine the mould for a pewter cast chassis.
chassis

Regards, Alan
 

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QUOTE (speedyroadster @ 11 Oct 2011, 18:06) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I have an MDX20 at work, great little machine! The 3D scanning attachment works with a sensitive probe (rather than a lazer) which 'feels' its way in a grid fashion to work out the 3D surface. You can set so it is very accurate but it will take along time.

I scanned a 1/24 model Smart Roadster and then scaled it down to 1/32 using the software provided and machined it out of cavity wall insulation foam which it can tackle fairly easily. The surface would still need some sanding and cleaning up. My idea was to make a mould from this and then cast it in resin. I haven't managed to finish it yet - it's work in progress

I used it to machine the mould for a pewter cast chassis.
chassis

Regards, Alan

You mention it for the first time, Alan : "machined". I was a bit irritated after reading the subject of this thread and then seeing the film. Where is the printing ?

I read the description on Roland´s homepage : "...Easy-to-use and compatible with many popular 3D CAD software programs, the MDX-20/15 is an affordable, all-in-one scanning and milling device..."

I´d prefer it being a 3D printer...

Roland ( no, I´m not form the firm
)
 

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So in theory you could put a die cast model car into it, scan the outside and inside of the model car, then put in a suitable lump of plastic and it would machine away the unwanted plastic leaving a plastic replica of the die cast.
 

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I'm with Schackel, the title is misleading - its not in any shape or form a 3D printer. Rapid prototype machine, yes, 3D printer, no.
 

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QUOTE (Julian_Boolean @ 11 Oct 2011, 20:26) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>So in theory you could put a die cast model car into it, scan the outside and inside of the model car, then put in a suitable lump of plastic and it would machine away the unwanted plastic leaving a plastic replica of the die cast.

It leaves a replica of the outer surface because the sensor can only scan on surface, not two simultaneously. When the outer surface is ready you´ll have to turn the pattern AND the copy very precisely so that the sensor and the router ar on the correct identical place to start and work in the correct identical direction. Otherwise maybe a few areas will be too thin or milled away...
I hope you understand what I mean in my "tourists´English"


Roland
 

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QUOTE (Wraith @ 11 Oct 2011, 20:16) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Almost £3000 puts it out of my price range, rather buy 100 cars ;-)

I'd find doing that almost as barmy, but I get what you mean.

The day when slot cars bodies, chassis and parts can be smacked out on a machine as easily as changing channels on your TV may come one day, but it is not here yet...
 

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QUOTE (Schackel @ 12 Oct 2011, 14:43) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It leaves a replica of the outer surface because the sensor can only scan on surface, not two simultaneously. When the outer surface is ready you´ll have to turn the pattern AND the copy very precisely so that the sensor and the router ar on the correct identical place to start and work in the correct identical direction. Otherwise maybe a few areas will be too thin or milled away...
I hope you understand what I mean in my "tourists´English"


Roland

Your English is better than my non-existent German so no apology required, and thanks for confirming what I thought.
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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This product is commonly known as a 2.5D CNC mill. It can't do full 3D due to the inability to reach underneath without re-locating the project piece. I have an acquaintance that has recently built himself one with a 400mm2 bed. I've been itching to have a play with it. So many possibilities spinning around in my head. He's currently in the process of milling an accurate scale model of the area's terrain. Waste of it's potential to me.


In simplest terms a prototyper that works by subtractive method (removing material) can be classified as a mill. One that prototypes by additive method can be classified as a printer.

Embs
 

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Interesting. I have never really understood 3D printing, SLA, rapid prototyping etc etc etc beyond the superficial.

How does the 'printer' add material?
 
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