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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a setup which is about 2 boxes worth of track joined together. Some of it is very poor quality (rusty) awaiting replacement this week with newer bits.

It is being powered by a deep cycle leisure battery which currently has 12.7v.

The input on the scalextric states "16v" or "16v 16v". I have it set on just "16v". I assume the other is for running both lanes (I will be mostly holding time trials so only need the one), this will teach me to not RTFM!

My question is about what sort of voltage should the track be getting?
I measured it and at any point even with the poor quality track that is making bad contact only 11.7v can be read. Is it regulated down to 11.7?
The cars are quick on the new bits of track but with wheels in the air on the input piece of track they seem to spin slower than they used to on my classic stuff.

Thanks,
Jack
 

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What sort of voltage should the track be getting?
Exactly how is the power connected to the track?

If it's going through an analogue controller pressed down to the full power position and connected direct to the track it should be the full battery voltage.

If it's going through an analogue controller pressed down to the full power position and connected to the track via a modern Scalex analogue power base it will probably be 1 to 1.2 volts less than the battery voltage. (There are rectifier diodes in the power base that reduce the voltage)

That's just measuring the voltage when the track isn't supplying any current.

Bad contact between the track section can either be completely dead or just high resistance.
If they are high resistance, you'll read the same voltage all the way round the track when there is no load.
Once you put some load on, such as a car motor, the voltage will drop downstream of the high resistance joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (300SLR @ 6 Jun 2012, 10:46) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>What sort of voltage should the track be getting?
Exactly how is the power connected to the track?

If it's going through an analogue controller pressed down to the full power position and connected direct to the track it should be the full battery voltage.

If it's going through an analogue controller pressed down to the full power position and connected to the track via a modern Scalex analogue power base it will probably be 1 to 1.2 volts less than the battery voltage. (There are rectifier diodes in the power base that reduce the voltage)

That's just measuring the voltage when the track isn't supplying any current.

Bad contact between the track section can either be completely dead or just high resistance.
If they are high resistance, you'll read the same voltage all the way round the track when there is no load.
Once you put some load on, such as a car motor, the voltage will drop downstream of the high resistance joints.

The power goes from the battery terminals (croc clips via a fuse (3 amp). The wires from the battery connect to the wires that usually connect to the 240v plug - I have cut the plug lead and soldered these to it.

Thanks for the advice. Yes, you are right there....I have all the volts and but can't pull any amps until I get rid of the bad track.

So, a volt less than the battery supplies when measured on the track is normal then
 

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So, a volt less than the battery supplies when measured on the track is normal then
It's normal if you connect by a Scalex power base, otherwise it isn't normal
In your set up the Scalex power base only contributes somewhere convenient to plug in, and the voltage drop. If you want to eliminate the voltage drop caused by the power base, just dispense with the power base and connect direct to the track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (300SLR @ 6 Jun 2012, 10:19) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>So, a volt less than the battery supplies when measured on the track is normal then
It's normal if you connect by a Scalex power base, otherwise it isn't normal
In your set up the Scalex power base only contributes somewhere convenient to plug in, and the voltage drop. If you want to eliminate the voltage drop caused by the power base, just dispense with the power base and connect direct to the track.

If I was using classic track where the red clip connects underneath the track this would be easy to do so and I could use the old style controller. With the newer type with a 3.5mm jack as the controller connection I don't think it would be so easy. Unless anyone knows otherwise.

I guess the one missing volt might be wasted as heat but it still seems plenty quick enough. This is for use at fairs and fetes so a slower car might be a good idea!
Thanks,
Jack
 

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You are right about slower cars being a good idea at fairs and fetes!
In fact it might be worth considering wiring a few more diodes in to drop the voltage even more.

While no rewiring can be as easy as just plugging in an existing connector., wiring those controllers in direct is a pretty simple wiring task.

Yes, the voltage drop is wasted as heat warming up the power base.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks. I will look at wiring them direct in the future. I thought it may be a little more complicated as the newer controllers might send a signal rather than power as per the old style.
 

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If you are talking analogue, they operate in exactly the same way as the old controllers.

Scalex digital works in a very different way.
 

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QUOTE (Jack155Q4 @ 6 Jun 2012, 13:05) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I thought it may be a little more complicated as the newer controllers might send a signal rather than power as per the old style.

No, not unless you change to digital and then you need a whole new system with new powerbase etc.

crossed posts with 300SLR - you are tooooo quick.....
 
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