SlotForum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,699 Posts
One might argue that the thing that you don’t allow is regulation or standardisation.

There’s always a balance to strike, which some clubs and organisers achieve better than others.

Slot car racing is one of the few competitive disciplines which can represent a different thing to every single person in the room. Trying to please them all, is of course, impossible.
 

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,699 Posts
This is and always will be a contentious subject, but rules in general are always instigated to slow down the fast drivers never to force the slower guys to speed up
I mean. They could always just learn to drive faster? I think Mr zero5 argues this in another topic just yesterday..

If more honest conversations were had around the fact the “fast guys” are fast because they’re actually good drivers and not just because of their car choice or spec then maybe rule makers would not need to create this artificial barrier that prohibits the inevitable rainbow chasing of the back markers who think they’ll just go a bit quicker if they had the latest XYZ..
 

·
Gary Skipp
Joined
·
6,699 Posts
My 10c worth,

- clubs that have grids full of obsolete cars are on a one way trip to extinction (specially if those cars are the winning cars) because a newbie can't get hold of the cars to compete. Still racing spirit pugs? Still racing AllSlot F1? Really??
While I absolutely agree with you here Alan, I feel this is a problem that most clubs are going to struggle with. It was the case when I was club racing 15 years ago, never mind now. F1 was either an F187 or the Proslot Ferrari, neither of which were easy to find. Touring cars were dominated by the ProSlot Alfa Romeo, same story, and even if you found one the gear would be broken! Same story for the ProSlot GT cars, the Ferrari again being the best, which ruled the GT2 class at Phoenix pretty much until the Ninco Japanese GT cars arrived.

And the more restrictive a rule set is then the harder it becomes to avoid this problem. Some cars are just better than others. If a given rule set doesn’t let you do anything about that, then you’re stuck with that car, no matter how old or hard to find it may be.

The “standard cars” mentality offers a very curious paradox. It appears accessible, but often requires the most investment to find a “good” standard car/motor/chassis. Advantage seekers gonna seek..

Meanwhile the open rule set appears intimidating and costly, yet it’s actually the most efficient equaliser when it comes to building something competitive.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top