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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that lighter fluid (naptha) is the substance of choice for cleaning tires and I believe it also softens them for better grip. But I'm wondering if there are other substances.

Specifically, I'm wondering about a bleach solution to soften tires and make them grippier. I know I've seen bleach used on drag tires during a burn-out. My understanding is that the burn-out both heats the tire for better grip and that the bleach interacts with and softens the rubber. If so, will a mild bleach solution have the same effect on rubber-based slot car tires?

Also, is denatured alcohol effective for cleaning tires?

Thanks for any information.


Mike
 

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Rich Dumas
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Many different types of "rubber" are used to make slot car tires, including natural latex, PVC, neoprene, silicone, urethane and various mixtures. A treatment that works with one tire may have no effect on the next one, or it may turn the tire into a puddle of goo. Manufactures also change their tire formulations, so a treatment that has worked well in the past can become useless.
 

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Graham Windle
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3 in one oil or wd40 works well on most rubber nothing works on neoprene or silicon just keep them clean.For kids use I would recomend sun tan lotion .or baby oil
 

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This is one of those "on/off" topic replies.

Bleach is used on some burnouts because it generates white smoke. That's it, just smoke
Nasty stuff and only people with under powered cars would ever do it. The tire compounds used in racing tires are designed to soften at high temperatures so just spinning, slipping or scuffing the tires will work. However, this stuff only applies to REAL race tires, not slot car tires or street car tires. For anyone interested, you NEVER heat up street tires unless they are specifically designed for it. Common street tires are designed to operate at much lower temperatures than racing tires. When street tires get heated up they get real greasy. So if you're serious about a race with street tires, use cold tires. If you're just looking to impress your friends with a smokey burnout then preheat the tires before you go to wherever the burnout will be performed. After preheating street tires you'll have a hard time finding traction so be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
QUOTE (a Bill @ 3 Nov 2004, 09:39)This is one of those "on/off" topic replies.

Bleach is used on some burnouts because it generates white smoke. That's it, just smoke
Nasty stuff and only people with under powered cars would ever do it. The tire compounds used in racing tires are designed to soften at high temperatures so just spinning, slipping or scuffing the tires will work. However, this stuff only applies to REAL race tires, not slot car tires or street car tires. For anyone interested, you NEVER heat up street tires unless they are specifically designed for it. Common street tires are designed to operate at much lower temperatures than racing tires. When street tires get heated up they get real greasy. So if you're serious about a race with street tires, use cold tires. If you're just looking to impress your friends with a smokey burnout then preheat the tires before you go to wherever the burnout will be performed. After preheating street tires you'll have a hard time finding traction so be careful.
<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks Bill. Good summary. So, on real race tires, slipping the tires on water or simply on a dry track is beneficial because it heats up the tire. Nothing in bleach interacts with the tire to soften it any further. And... keep those street tires cool.
 

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Allan Wakefield
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Scalextric made a 'smoking start' oil awhile back that will do the trick for awhile. I have a sachet of it in a box at the track somewhere if you want it to try.

Good old sticky tape/parcel tape or gaffer tape will clean tyres the best, without sticky residue and wipe the track with a barely damp cloth before each race session. Works wonders!

That said we use WD40 on the sponge tyres we run our TSRF and Plafit tyres on and this works REALLY well after an initial slip slide up the main straight.

You MUST get Wankel in on this thread - ask him if he remembers my first trip to Oxfords track when they had other guests who were (sneakily and out of the main room) using some sticky brown substance to treat their tyres, then ask him what was rumoured to be in it!!!
 

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This going to sound crazy, but I found a simple way to turn old, hard and dry tires into tires with reasonable traction.

I have old Kokomo Electricars from the 1930's and they tend to have very hard and cracked tires that have almost no traction. In desperation I tried painting them with something called Plastic Dip, from Ace Hardware, and after a couple of coats they had much better traction and looked much better. The cracks got filled and the tires looked like the tires on a mint in the box car I have. Good luck!
 

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~ Hi ~

There's so many different ways & personal choice in sorting tyres out.

Click the link below & it shows how I Treat'n'True my rubber tyres.


~ Cheers ~

~
~
 
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