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Circuit Owner
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I'm new to the 1:32 slot car scene. Until a couple of months ago my last Airfix car was airbrushed and assembled about 34 years ago (it was a Z28 Camaro or '69 Charger as far as I recall).

I have bought a few cars ranging from old Scalextric (C125 Porsche, C53 Datsun 260Z, Ford Taurus NASCAR), some modern SCX Nascars and AutoArt road cars through to exotics (Fly Panox LMP, Team Slot Saleen, Ninco 4WD Scooby) and a handful of other stuff.

I have also seen a few of the "thingies" that look like they were designed by 8 year olds but are obviously functional.

Looking at prices paid on a famous auction site there appears to be a school of thought that associates real life performance with the scale replica (although why people expect a Scalextric Aston LMP to perform well just because it's the same shape as a storming real life car is beyond me). I'm no aerodynamicist but as far as I know an aerofoil will not work below 50mph and in scale terms that means your Chapparal would have to be doing a speed of 1,600mph before the wing actually worked. (Cornering through 90 degrees in the scale equivalent of 3 car lengths at 1,600mph would of course reduce a live driver to a dead 4cm thick mess on the window on the outside of the turn so the whole realism debate gets shot to pieces right there).

The other school appreciates a car for its underpinnings believing that engineering is everything.

I love the racing classes - it means the field can be levelled and everybody can enjoy racing their favoured style of car.

BUT here's the question - if you HAD to choose one style of car, one engineering formula etc. - what would your weapon of choice be?

I'm asking because I'm looking for a project and it would be fun to try to build the consensus slot car.

So what would you choose if you were only allowed one racing car?

Saloon, coupe, 2 seater or single seater?
Hard top or open top?
Front engine, in-line rear/mid mounted, sidewinder or anglewinder?
Bigger rear wheels, wider rear wheels or same size all round?
Ribbed, conventional slick or sticky tyres?
One piece shell (like Scalextric Super Resistant) or cockpit detail?
Lights or no lights?
Sprung or unsprung guide?
Single front axle or independents?
2WD or 4WD? (and Band or shaft drive?)
Heavy or lightweight?
Magnet or no magnet?
Adjustable chassis or fixed formula? If adjustable - in what way?

If there is enough interest I will make an attempt to build it and put the story on this forum as it unfolds. I'm not saying it will be world beating but it could be a lot of fun and we may even invent a new class. Either way it should make for an interesting debate!
 

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Circuit Owner
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
QUOTE (Flange @ 9 Aug 2011, 23:00) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>Slot.it mazda le mans edition .... end of!

Nice. But what is it about the Mazda that makes it so good? Where, in your opinion/experience, does it get its edge over other racers?
 

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One petunia in a field of onions
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6,455 Posts
I don't think there is even a remote possibility of consensus being reached. Favourite cars can depend so much on mood. I may enjoy something that gives me a challenge today but want something that runs like it's on rails tomorrow (ok... bad pun not intended).

I love my Ninco Classics when I'm just after an easy, cruising drive. SCX rallies when I want some rough and tumble fun. A Ninco Exige when I want a workout for the concentration. An NSR GT40 when I feel the need, the need for speed. And on it goes.

Embs
 

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Premium Member
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376 Posts
QUOTE (Mr Modifier @ 9 Aug 2011, 21:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>as I know an aerofoil will not work below 50mph and in scale terms that means your Chapparal would have to be doing a speed of 1,600mph before the wing actually worked. (Cornering through 90 degrees in the scale equivalent of 3 car lengths at 1,600mph would of course reduce a live driver to a dead 4cm thick mess on the window on the outside of the turn so the whole realism debate gets shot to pieces right there).

I've always assumed aerofoils have very little effect on model cars. Does anybody know the reason why?

Kind regards,
Ben

ps Surely model aircraft fly at speeds under 50mph?
 

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Lee Green
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1,995 Posts
I find that the le-mans limited edition mazda is the best looking and fastest (tuneable) slot car i have . Its pretty light and handles really well. Its also got a very low centre of gravity
 

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Circuit Owner
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
QUOTE (Benjamin @ 9 Aug 2011, 23:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I've always assumed aerofoils have very little effect on model cars. Does anybody know the reason why?

Kind regards,
Ben

ps Surely model aircraft fly at speeds under 50mph?

As I said I'm no aerodynamicist. Paper planes fly at 5mph. Model planes at probably 15-20mph. I quote 50mph because that's about the speed for optimum fuel economy and the speed that flies quash on your windscreen rather than get pushed up and away by the cushion of air pushed ahead by the screen. It appears to be a function of weight, density, aerodynamic efficiency, proximity to the ground, aerodynamic surface area and so on. It's probably all different at 1/32. But the air isn't scaled down so it's 32x thicker!

Has anybody built a 1/32 wind tunnel?!?

I should imagine centre of gravity and weight would be the major factor given the amount of cornering a slot car does - not enough straight line stuff to exploit ground effect etc. Except for drag racing of course!

So the question remains - if you had no choice and had to choose a single all-round car - whatvwould it be?
 

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350 Posts
OK, let's see : on SS analogue track
- low gravity center
- as large as possible and not too short (ex Maserati MC12)
- lightweight
- supergrip tires behind and propulsion
- zero grip front tires - separate front axles adjustable in height.
- anglewinder ( 90° for max weight on rear axe) or lead ballast in the rear
- high torque motor
- no magnet
- guide plate must be able to admit angle of 80 degrees car/slot.(or 360° drift guide)
- detailed car with interior and driver.
- breakable parts in silicone rubber (mirrors, wings, antennas, etc.)
- with front and rear lights for night-racing (evt. + stoplights)
 

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Premium Member
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10,109 Posts
I'm an aeronautical engineer (gasp!). The easy way to consider it is that you need to scale down everything to get the same effect, and that means distance between atoms in the air. So you need the air to be considerably more dense to get an effect. This has been done in some wind tunnels in the past to allow scale models to be representative, but never to the extent you would need to do for 1/32 scale, the pressures would be intolerable. So use a magnet and get the equivalent downforce to get the best simulation. OK its not speed dependent, but such is life...
 

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QUOTE (Koala2 @ 9 Aug 2011, 23:34) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>OK, let's see : on SS analogue track
- low gravity center
- as large as possible and not too short (ex Maserati MC12)
- lightweight
- supergrip tires behind and propulsion
- zero grip front tires - separate front axles adjustable in height.
- anglewinder ( 90° for max weight on rear axe) or lead ballast in the rear
- high torque motor
- no magnet
- guide plate must be able to admit angle of 80 degrees car/slot.(or 360° drift guide)
- detailed car with interior and driver.
- breakable parts in silicone rubber (mirrors, wings, antennas, etc.)
- with front and rear lights for night-racing (evt. + stoplights)

OK, my take: on Scalextric Classic analogue track
- low gravity centre
- Long distance between guide pivot and rear axle, as small overhangs front and rear as possible
- lightweight
- supergrip tyres behind and propulsion
- zero grip front tyres - solid front axle adjustable in height.
- anglewinder ( 60° for optimum mass distribution - most to rear axle, some to guide)
- high torque boxer motor, high current, high RPM, strong braking effect
- no magnet
- guide plate must be able to admit angle of 80 degrees car/slot.
- detailed car with interior and driver.
- breakable parts in silicone rubber (mirrors, wings, antennas, etc.)
- with front and rear lights for night-racing (evt. + stoplights)
 

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Banned
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An NSR Mosler as is for $10 !!! Lol.
 

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It all depends on your objective. I have seen a 32nd scale wing car smash anything imaginable at a routed home track but it doesn't look like a car. I recently raced at the Australian national scale championships where all the normal plastic chassis classes were joined by a few Plafit classes and 1 magnet class and i raced most classes. Ask ten different guys what was their favourite class and i doubt you will get an overwhelmingly common response.

I liked the NSR classes the best because they handle well but still feel alive in your hands whilst the metal chassis cars were smoother but less demanding of the driver. Some guys liked the magnet class others will have liked the slot.it group C Others will say the SCX nascars are the epitome of a good slotcar,cheap fun and reliable with nothing to break off. Each to their own and i doubt there is ever going to be an ultimate because peoples objectives are different.
 

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Yer Plafit classes rock! Especially 1:24!
 

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Circuit Owner
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
QUOTE (roveros @ 10 Aug 2011, 10:15) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>It all depends on your objective. I have seen a 32nd scale wing car smash anything imaginable at a routed home track but it doesn't look like a car. I recently raced at the Australian national scale championships where all the normal plastic chassis classes were joined by a few Plafit classes and 1 magnet class and i raced most classes. Ask ten different guys what was their favourite class and i doubt you will get an overwhelmingly common response.

I liked the NSR classes the best because they handle well but still feel alive in your hands whilst the metal chassis cars were smoother but less demanding of the driver. Some guys liked the magnet class others will have liked the slot.it group C Others will say the SCX nascars are the epitome of a good slotcar,cheap fun and reliable with nothing to break off. Each to their own and i doubt there is ever going to be an ultimate because peoples objectives are different.

Good shout on the SCX NASCARS. I have access to a toy wholesaler and they were having a stock clearance last month so I managed to buy 6 different, brand new SCX NASCARS for £6.10 each including VAT!!! (about AUS$9.58 each)

I'm going to chip these and run all six at the same time on my Scalextric setup - it will make a nice change from poker night and I won't care too much if my mates smash them up! I will tell them they cost £30 each of course ;-)

They are not going to be my best cars by a long way but given the choice between running my best car on my own or racing cheap cars carefree against 5 others on a digital track I'll settle for race carnage every time!!!
 

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Tore
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1,692 Posts
"What would make the perfect slot car?"

IMHO it's already here: Slot.it GT40 "Gulf" #6



Perfect compromise between a scale replica model and a serious racing slotcar, comes with high quality parts + lots of tune up parts available, well designed chassis, low price and it replicates one of the best looking and most iconic racing cars in history.
 

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I understand with slot cars you can either have 3 or 5 points of contact. I've seen comments regarding the distance from the guide pivot and the rear axle but is there an optimum distance from the guide pivot and the front axle with a 5 point of contact vehicle? I ask as I've just lengthened the front of a PCS chassis so that the guide is further forward than standard - should I see an improvement?

Regards, Alan
 

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hi, if you dont think air controlls work, have a look at the grotesque wing cars on you tube under 2 secs lap on a 155ft king track, no magnets. the starting place is the chassis if its not spring steel or piano wire and brass look at the mr slot car- slot it-nsr and new sloting+-avant chassis. use them as the base for your car ,no mag. then tyres?. see the debates on this then decide, all the best chassis to tune just decide which body you like. as an aside nsr have got all the right parts to begin with, so it doesn,cost extra to upgrade, alloy air wheels ect, buy the way! i dont have an nsr its a lot cheaper for me to scratchbuild. have fun john
.
 

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QUOTE (Mr Modifier @ 9 Aug 2011, 22:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I'm no aerodynamicist but as far as I know an aerofoil will not work below 50mph and in scale terms that means your Chapparal would have to be doing a speed of 1,600mph before the wing actually worked. (Cornering through 90 degrees in the scale equivalent of 3 car lengths at 1,600mph would of course reduce a live driver to a dead 4cm thick mess on the window on the outside of the turn so the whole realism debate gets shot to pieces right there).
Scaling aerodynamic forces doesn't work like that.

Aerodynamic forces are a significant contributor to the performance of slot cars a lot less extreme than wing cars. The aerodynamic forces are probably negligible at home set speeds.

Anyway back to the plot - The perfect slot car.
The perfect car would meet the rules for the best race meetings.
It would be quick enough to win the final (even with me driving it) and good looking enough to win concourse.
It would be a joy to drive.
It would never break down.

Don't think I've ever seen the perfect slot car, doubt I ever will!
 

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QUOTE (speedyroadster @ 10 Aug 2011, 18:54) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>I understand with slot cars you can either have 3 or 5 points of contact. I've seen comments regarding the distance from the guide pivot and the rear axle but is there an optimum distance from the guide pivot and the front axle with a 5 point of contact vehicle? I ask as I've just lengthened the front of a PCS chassis so that the guide is further forward than standard - should I see an improvement?

Regards, Alan
Try it and see if it is an improvement for your conditions.
The only universal answer to that question is there is no universal answer

Longer guide lead cars tend to be more stable, but can be less good at changing direction quickly.
There are so many other things that make a differance to how a car goes, optimum guide lead for one set up isn't necessarily the optimum for others.
The optimum also depends on track conditions, longer guide lead cars tend to run with the rear wheels further out from the slot than short guide lead cars. When there is less grip out wide (which there usually is if all the other cars are short guide lead), a longer guide lead car will be at a disadvantage.

The quickest set up for a lot of cars is neither 3 nor 5 points of contact. It is 4 points of contact in corners (both back wheels, the guide and the outside front) and 3 points on the straight (both back wheels and the guide touching with both side fronts a tiny amount clear of the track)
 
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