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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wanted some opinions on which Prof Motor Tyres to try on my Fly Cars

They are all mostly 1970s stock cars (512, Lola, 917k and Chevrons)
What is the difference between Indy Grips and Roadhuggers - I am running on Scalextric Classic track and find the standard Fly tyres a little lacking in grip even when trued and cleaned.

Thanks all
Mark
 

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I run Sport track and Prof Motor tyres are fantastic - PPRSlots are also just as
good (infact better on my ninco's)
http://www.pprslots.com/
and in my experience work better on Classic than Prof Motor.

Though i have been told Ortmann's are the best , I have yet (!) to try
them.
 

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Nobby Berkshire
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Try your question on Slotcarillustrated as the US folks go nuts on these tyres. All I know is that the roadhuggers cost much more and that the makers don't tell you why!
 

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well i have only done a tyre swap for the first time, swapping ninco slicks for proslot racings. the proslots are reeealy grippy though, ive only tried them on a very small track that i set up temporarily but i should be able to let you know by sunday (i set my track up over the weekend)
 

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I put an order in with Prof Motor yesterday for some of the new compound Indy Grips for my two Slot.It 956's and Fly Daytona as all three cars are just a bit too tail happy around my circuit.
I can post my before and after results here if interested.
 

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René 'Vialli' Christensen
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QUOTE (GBMark @ 13 Jul 2004, 10:27)I can post my before and after results here if interested.
Yes, let's have the test results here!
 

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I'm interested in those tyres too, especially for SCX cars to be used on Carrera track.

I could be wrong, but I think that Professor Motor have two different compounds. I seem to remember that the latest one works better than the first one.

It could be useful to mention what type has been used when giving results.
 

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Gee, you guys don't get out much. There has been a lot of discussion recently on SCI about the relative merits of the various after market tires. The primary point to keep in mind though, is that there is no simple answer as to which tire is best. Copied below is part of an earlier post I made in an SCI thread.

"Many variables will affect your results - type of track, type of car, magnets/no magnets, type of paint used on routed tracks, how it was applied (rolled, sprayed), how often you clean your track, whether you run a mix of tire types, etc. What might be the cat's meow for one person will provide indifferent performance for someone else on a different track. As often mentioned in the past, running different tire types on a given track often results in compromising performance of one type versus another. Rubber tires progressively lay down a groove which helps adhesion, whereas silicones work to pick up that groove and any other speck of dust on the track surface.

I personally have not yet tried Ortmann's or Pumas, and am not sure of the material used for each, but it has been my experience that "pure" silicones do better on smooth tracks than the newer "poly blends." My track is routed, with a very smooth (some say "slick") sprayed matte enamel surface. Stock rubber tires normally do not work at all. Standard conversion for all my cars has always been original Indy Grips or Road Monkeys. As most people know, Indy Grips are now produced using a poly blend formula, which makes them impervious to splitting. Unfortunately, they simply do not perform as well on my track as the old original silicone formula. I suspect Ortmann's and other blended formulas would be similar.

I have found the type of tire used is usually the primary determining factor in overall car performance. Using Robert's report as a model, I think it would be very helpful if someone undertook a comprehensive review of tire types and brands, including material composition, sizes available, and appearance and detail factors. Numerical data also could be included to compare performance, but the main objective in my mind would NOT be in trying to establish which brand is "best", but rather to provide some guidance about compatibility with various track types and surfaces. Or has this already been done?"

mp
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for all the advice


I have obtained Ortmans, Indy Grips and RoadHuggers and have also been oiling my Fly Tyres as well. My conclusion and preference so far are the Indy grips
they seem to be the best quality - fitting accurately and needing very little truing making the cars perform superbly on them and my challenger is now glued to the track. The roadhuggers
are also good and seem a little softer but need more truing as they seem to slope outwards after this the cars are also hugely improved. The Ortmans
are the most disappointing as they just dont seem to fit that well and are very uneven needing a lot of truing. All of these tyres have mad a big difference on Classic track compared to the standard Fly tyres and just instill more confidence making racing more fun. I have found though that oiling the Fly tyres knocks a few tenths off a lap and are much better. However keeping the track and tyres clean are crucial and need to be attended to reguarly.
On a seperate note I have a small Unimat engineers lathe and reckon that I will be able to set that up as a semi-pro tyre truer with a little application of the grey matter - has anyone tried such a thing? I am fed up trying to stand the car on sandpaper!!!!

Cheers Mark
 

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Al Schwartz
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QUOTE On a seperate note I have a small Unimat engineers lathe and reckon that I will be able to set that up as a semi-pro tyre truer with a little application of the grey matter - has anyone tried such a thing? I am fed up trying to stand the car on sandpaper!!!!

I have done just that. I used a Dremel tool with a flex shaft attached and made a little collar for the hand piece with a projected boss on the side which clamps to my tool holder making, in effect, a tool post grinder. With the tire or tires/wheels mounted on an axle and held in a 3/32" collet, I run the lathe in reverse and bring the dremel handpiece with a sanding drum mounted into light contact. By running the tool back and forth with the carriage feed, I get a perfectly square and uniform finish even if the handpiece is not perfectly square in the tool post.

I have only used this on set screw fastened aluminum wheels - don't know how well it would work with plastic.

EM
 
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