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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the most popular 1/24 scale slot cars for the serious collector is the Cox Chaparral 2E. Issued in three different versions plus a body kit, the ready to race version is by far the easiest to find, as hundreds of thousands were produced and many thousands have survived.
Presented in a unique display box, the model was sold partially assembled, most of the snap-on parts enclosed inside a clear plastic bag stapled on the side of a corrugated cardboard spacer that protected the high-mounted wing.
Almost all the models surviving in their original box have been assembled, and it is very rare in fact to find a "virgin" example, untouched since packed by the genteel damsel's at the Cox Center in Santa Ana. But this is the case for this pristine example, allowing one to see how they were actually offered to the public. So let's look at the pictures:





As one can see, the side scoops, plated parts and decals are not installed, "some assembly required".



The parts and instructions are stapled on the side of the spacer, while the self-adhesive number decals are loose inside the box.



The plated bits are identical to that of the other two versions, the "mag" kit and the "IFC" kit, meaning the some of the parts (steering wheel…) will not be of any use of the RTR model.



The box top is rather tall to clear the base and the spacer.



Running gear is standard fare, using the "series 2" IFC chassis with the single guide hole, the motor rotating inside the center section so as to actuate the wing. Unfortunately, the design was a bit weak, causing the pinion to begin chewing on the crown gear, then on its support. Many such cars are found in dire need of pinion, gear and mount replacements…
 

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Why were the parts in the Bag?

To give the purchaser something to do (makes 'em feel good!)

or was it some way of avoiding purchase tax, (I.E. Its not complete so why should the "assembler" pay purchase tax as he's an unpaid employee of Cox.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bernard, thanks! We are making tremendous efforts to find the best possible examples for the museum. Sometimes it is quite costly, but the end justifies the means!


QUOTE Why were the parts in the Bag?
To give the purchaser something to do (makes 'em feel good!)
or was it some way of avoiding purchase tax, (I.E. Its not complete so why should the "assembler" pay purchase tax as he's an unpaid employee of Cox.)
Unknown, but likely for cost reasons. While it does not take that long to assemble the parts, it is a delicate job and would have likely cut too much of the possible profit in labor costs.
All other Cox RTR models were assembled in Hong Kong by low-cost Chinese labor, but the 2E was made entirely in Santa Ana save for its motor. While the Cox company was not unionized (I attended a government-mandated meeting to try forcing a local union in the company, that a vast majority of employees opposed), the labor costs in American were over 10 times higher than those in the Far East.
 
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