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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,
I have recently ordered some of the 'Classic' range of fibreglass bodyshells and would appreciate any advise any of you can provide on working with this material. From previous posts I understand that I should expect to do lots of filling, any thing else ? What types of paint are suitable, can I use tamiya sprays ?

Thanks for any help, regards
Duane.
 

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Where would we be without Classic? Penny for penny the best value in Slot Racing!

My standard procedure is to give them a good wash in soapy water, dry thoroughly, then attack all vents, radiators, wheel arches etc with a Dremel. I like to work away at the inner edge of wheel arches as far as I dare to give the appearance of a thin panel edge. Sometimes a little internal reinforcement with a fillet of epoxy is a good idea in very fragile places. Tidy up with needle files, then go over the whole body with 800 grit wet & dry paper to show up any dips and dimples- which they do have. Then I fill up any imperfections with Timbafill Styrene wood filler- available from any DIY shop. Mix it up with the catalyst and it dries hard to a very smooth and workable finish in 5 mins. It sticks well to the fibreglass, and files, sandpapers, slices to whatever shape you want very easily. Then wash again, give a spray of appropriate undercoat, and fill all the other little holes that you missed first time. Repeat the process until you have a lovely little shell ready for colour spraying. Any paint seems to work, as long as the base coat is compatible. I use Halfords auto touch up sprays myself.

Good luck and have fun!
 

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Al Schwartz
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In my experience, the biggest thing to watch for in working with these shells is voids between the gel coat and the underlying resin/glass structure. I deliberately tap all over the body with the peen end of a small jeweler's hammer to try and break through any unsupported areas before I have gotten to the finishing stage. The polyester resin is very brittle and will shatter if unsupported. Once discovered, the voids can be filled with Milliput which adheres very well and is slow curing so that any lost detail can be worked back up with small tools dipped in water. Beyond that, a good cleaning, sanding and filling of obvious surface imperfections as mentioned above will do the trick.

My primer of choice at the moment is the grey Tamiya rattle can primer - it is easy to use, sticks very well and dries to a perfectly smooth, flat finish.

EM
 

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I didn't figure you to be a hammer mechanic Alan.


What I have done with the fiberglas ones I have, is to put a very strong light up behind the top side of the body shell and sure enough any thin spots will show up very nicely. Anything I can't see too much light through should be fine for reworking a bit more on the top surface.

Works for me but heres to the hammer and tongs approach.


Larry S.
 

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Anthony Bartlett
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guys - great to read all this info on resin cars. I have never been a 'techie', and so never understood why often I would get to the decalling part and then a piece would fall off the body and I would have to start again !!! So there are 2 layers on the body !!! Hurrmmmph - will use the light technique as opposed to the rail tapping kind - keep up the info -
 

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All good advice which I know but never manage to follow!

The key is time.

If you suddenly realise that the event is in five days time and you have not started work prepared the glassfibre body ( a typical situation for me) there is no chance of doing a good concourse job.
 

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John Roche
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Obviously nobody else had tried so I've just put an old Classic shell that I'd previously ruined with a slip of the dremel in the dishwasher. It came out nice and clean with no apparent damage.



John
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the replies so far.
I have received my classic shells, and have another request for tips -

Some of the models - (Maserati Breadvan, Porsche 917) come with a vac form that I am guessing must be painted to represent part of the body as well as the screen.

Can anyone post some examples of a model where they have done this and provide tips on any of the following -
tips for gettting clean/seamless joins between the vac form and fibreglass
what paints and primer to use on vac forms
any detailing tips i.e. pillars

Thanks again,
Duane
 
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