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I have just discovered this thread and have spent the last hour devouring it. What a feast. Many thanks to all the contributors of such fascinating archive material. I cannot resist putting in my own two 'penneth. These are all photo's and/or cars that have inspired me over the years.

One of the first motor racing books I read when about 9 years old was Charles Jarrott's Ten Years of Motors and Motor Racing which covers the first ten years of the sport. In it there is a chapter on the disastrous Paris Madrid race of 1903 which spelled the (temporary) end of open road racing. I was very impressed by the following two photo', and still am.

Plant Natural landscape Sky Tree Grass


Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle Auto part Automotive wheel system


This type of car is enthusiastically raced today of course and looks to be great fun. Here is a Panhard.

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire


Reference has been made to the Vanderbilt Cup Races and an early competitor was this fearsome steam car. It is huge when seen in the flesh, and I cannot imagine doing 90 mph on a dirt track perched on the bar stool type seat.

Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire


To add to the Lancia Ferrari D50 series, this one is in the Ferrari Museum at Modena.

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire


As far as best photo's of all time, this has to be up there. Fangio in a 250F at Rouen 1957. Note the haze of tyre smoke from the outer left rear.

Tire Wheel Photograph Vehicle Car


On the subject of tyre smoke the old slingshot dragsters couldn't be beaten. As the driving instructor would say - let the clutch in gently.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Off-road racing


A final one for the eclection which still makes my bum clench when I look at it. The late William Dunlop at speed.

Helmet Sports equipment Sports gear Vehicle Automotive tire
 

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In post 290 Trisha shows us a photo of Nuvolari and Rosemeyer in conversation. I wonder what language they used?

I visited Manova some years ago and made a bee-line for the Nuvolari Museum. It was not easy to find as although being in the centre of the city it is accessed through an inconspicuous door rather like a speakeasy. In a frame on the wall was a letter from Tazio to Alfred Neubauer, and Neubauer's reply - both in Italian, The content was amusing.

Nuvolari had been driving his road going Alfa Romeo home from a race and had been forced off the road by a hard charging Caracciola. Nuvolari's car was damaged and he demanded compensation from Mercedes Benz. Neubauer wrote back apologising for his inconvenience and sending him what he considered the car to be worth - 400 lire.
 

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Nicely daubed!

I was not familiar with how he dented the car. The only thing I know about that race (without looking anything up) is that he said that he felt completely in tune with the car that day and the car was perfectly balanced. He enjoyed himself.

I regret never having seen Fangio in the flesh. It would have been nice to have shaken his hand.
 

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I think that one is 2 litres unblown, built for the F2 regs at the time whereas the E type A-U was to be a blown 1.5 litre engine for F1? There is a remarkable thread on the Autosport Nostalgia Forum starting in 2000 and reading like a John Le Carre thriller about the discovery of the history of this. Worth reading if you have a spare two hours.
 

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Interesting photo's David. The suspension movement is clearly extremely small. In the early 1980's I was at a test day at Donington Park and there was an F1 Williams there for a thrash.It had Rosberg's name on it but I don't think he was there though. Looking at the suspension, the shock absorber struts were polished up for about 6 mm only, showing the very limited bump travel. Even allowing for the angle of the shocker, this amounts to about 8 or 9 mm vertical bump travel at the wheel. The tyres must have done most of the work then too.
 

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He was doubly lucky as the prang that was filmed was the second time it happened to him. The first occurrence was out of anyone's sight and he was severely told off for losing control. They didn't believe that the car was aerodynamically dodgy and he couldn't prove that it was not a driving error. Then it happened again, exactly as he described the first accident and it was caught on film.
 

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Ah - the "showroom price" class for standard cars. What fun. My motor club friend Roger Turner ran Mountsorrel Garage near Leicester which at the time had a Lada agency so he also saw the opportunity. Watching the drivers wrestle with 16 inch steering wheels and road tyres was entertaining. The cars were successful of course as the 1500 cc Moskvitch and the 1200cc Lada were in the same class as 850 Minis IIRC so as soon as there was a straight they were gone.
 

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The Bequet Delage photo is one of those action shots where you can feel the speed. The rear wheel looks to be distorting under the load and the front one is almost lifting from the ground. I wonder how many spokes broke on that run!

These days, I don't think its realised quite how much "give" there is in a wire wheel and just how it affects a car's handling. Colin Chapman was one of the first (and of course, Ferrari the last) to realise the benefits of stiff wheels with the Lotus wobblies, so that the contact patch position and spring rates were as per the suspension designers intent. It removed a variable from the design process.

Thanks for the thought provoking photo.
 

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An interesting photo. I am curious as to why the garage is thus named as Bolzano was way north of any of the Mille Miglia routes AFAIK.

The recovery truck looks like an ex US Army vehicle - liberated perhaps?
 

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I don't think so. The arrangements were quite different in that the Tipo A had a separate clutch, gearbox, propshaft and final drive unit behind each engine with the propshafts running parallel so that the final drive units were almost touching. After the second race a freewheel system was fitted behind each gearbox to help cornering as there was no differential.

The Tipo B had a clutch, gearbox and diff fixed to the engine with a dead space between the short half shafts. No one knows why this arrangement was chosen. It is widely written that it was to get the driver seated lower, but study of the car shows this not to be the case. The driver sits as high as in any of the conventional cars. There may have been a marginal saving in unsprung weight by having the diff. as a sprung part, but then there were two propshafts and final drives which would appear to negate that saving.

Both cars were successful.
 

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[QUOTE="Trisha, post: 2483473, member: 7 whilst feeling sympathy for the poor chap who has to run ahead of cars carrying a red flag.
[/QUOTE]
I think that that was an original problem with the Act in practice which helped get it repealed - too many accidents with the flag bearers.
Brakes have improved but driving standards haven’t
 

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And here we are seriously considering it as fuel for heavy trucks etc. Can you imagine the result of a multi-truck pile up on a motorway in the future?

I DO hope someone's actually thought about that.............
Hydrogen is likely be less dangerous than a tank full of petrol. The Hindenburg was spectacular but there were a lot of survivors. Hydrogen burns with a low flame temperature and is also so light that when free in air it goes upwards rapidly, as does the heat. There is an eyewitness account of a survivor of the Hindenburg standing amongst the wreckage with fire all around and above, and calmly looking for a way out - which was found - and then walking out to safety.

If the hydrogen is liquified and contained in a pressure vessel though, I am a bit apprehensive. Cold burns a re nasty.
 

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Nice and easy for the spectators to identify the drivers in those days! Legible names, large numbers, simple but different and unchanging helmets.
 
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