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LOVE that pic of Jim Clark chatting to Dan Gurney while sitting on the exhaust pipes of his Lotus 25.
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I hope they hadn't been running the engine recently or we'd only be able to see his feet in the next pic!
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The 1990's period F1 cars look so clean and 'aerodynamic' when seen against the current over-finned monsters to my mind.

I recall the FIA took steps to minimise the number of extra fins and stuff sticking out of the cars at one stage, but that seems to have gone by the board recently, the current Ferraris looking like a serious hazard to health with their vastly complex bargeboards!
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The first gas-turbine Rover BRM was good for around 7mpg, while the later car was around half that at (circa) 14mpg - figures that compare well with 4.7mpg achieved by the Group C Porsches in the mid 1980s. Obviously the Porsches had much greater speed and performance.

I can't recall all that was said by those who drove the LM Rover BRMs, but there were comments about the odd sense of absent engine-braking - an inherent tenet that led to the high wear-rate of brake pads.

Drivers also noted the rather frightening, aircraft-like noise of the cars.

Can't recall much else. An interesting experiment that was continued, briefly, with the Howmet, of course.
The Howmet suffered from the same slow throttle response as the BRM turbine cars. You could hear them opening the throttle while approaching Druids at Brands during the '68 BOAC 500, at least you could during the seven laps that the car remained in the race....

In an attempt to improve the throttle response the Howmet had a waste-gate fitted to the exhaust so the turbine could be kept buzzing while the waste gate dumped the excess power during braking. Sadly the waste gate jammed shut and the Howmet rammed the bank at Druids, right under my feet!

Turbines were also much more sensitive to air temperature than piston engines, and liked much cooler air for their intakes, making a driving rhythm in a long distance race more difficult.
 

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I'd love to have been a fly on the wall of the BMC team, watching them working out every last loophole in the regs of each event and turning the white elephant that was the Mini into an icon.
I spent quite a bit of time knocking around the Abingdon factory in the mid 60s, ostensibly working with Roy Brocklehurst & co trying to get various MG, Austin Healey and other BMH models through the US Safety Regulations. Now and then Roy & co .would ask us to test a bodyshell that wasn't your normal MGB, and weighed CONSIDERABLY less than the usual ones. If they were strong enough Roy & co. were all smiles, but sometimes they weren't and needed lots of modified panels before they came up to scratch.

Funnily enough almost all of those lighter MGBs had big holes in the floor, just the right width for a hefty roll cage.....
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After the US Teams came over here I competed in drag racing myself for a couple of years, but in the lowest possible class. My 'weapon of choice' was a Hillman Imp (yes, really....) with which my work colleague, John Read, and I trounced the opposition in our first year, but were thrashed by them in turn during year 2.
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Our 'vital tweak' was the fact that our car was built from a prototype lightweight Imp bodyshell that we bought from Pressed Steel for the princely sum of £75.
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I liked the car so much I built a slot racer of it.
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What a fabulous film David, thanks VERY much for linking it. So many famous faces in there, including a few I worked with at Abingdon at the time.
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That very 60s background music got a tad tiresome at times, but the visuals were outstanding!
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At the same time a Lockheed SR71 flew from New York to Farnborough in England in 1hr 55mins 42secs.
It sure did, and I was there to watch it arrive.

No wonder there was a fuel crisis that year, the amount of fuel that literally POURED out of the SR-71's wing tanks was awesome to behold! The ground crew came prepared with some HUGE drip trays they hastily positioned under the leaks.
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Apparently it was built that way so the gaps in the wings closed up as it got hotter at Mach 3, but of course they then opened up and leaked (a LOT...) as it cooled down again.
 

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Wasn't there something about it passing over Paris as it executed a U turn to line up for landing.
Not quite that far south, but it was a fair way away. The commentator at Farnborough was giving us updates on its position as it came in from the west, and turned north and east for its approach. It was certainly going fast!
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