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Never been to Monaco for the race, but did visit in 1994 when we had some spare time putting a trade show stand in at the tax free world exhibition in Cannes.
Did a lap of the circuit in a lwb high roof turbo diesel transit and parked it french style. Walked the track and was amazed at the elevation up to Casino Square from the start, the drop down to the tunnel was equally impressive, looks nothing on TV. Nice lunch in the Italian overlooking the drop from Casino Square, jus by where they swerve to avoid the manhole cover, not too expensive in October, fortunately.
 

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It was great that back in the day the top drivers would pedal sports cars, saloons, F2, indy etc.
Probably the most rounded was the great quick Vic, Elford. Many current btcc pilots get a run in historics at Goodwood, they seem to enjoy it.
 

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Love Donnington, it's just a short run along the A50 from us here in Alton, I appreciate it both as a track for viewing and as a feel, somehow it still feels clubby, less commercial.

I think Jonathan Palmers team have done a great job after the fiasco of the failed grand prix bid, complete with their no spectator cars at the track lunacy.

First went mid seventies when it had just reopened for a classic cars magazine classic car show, it was in the middle, absolutely surrounded by trees, shame they've all gone but it improves viewing.

Its had just about all the series over the years, remember DTM, ETC with the Texaco Eggenberger sierras, WEC with Jags Sauber and 962s,it always has a good turn out for Btcc, gt3 and historics.

Once upon a time you could park on the infield, you went in under the tunnel by the exhibition centre, now car auctions but originally a WW2 shadow factory, Rolls Royce I think.
Tom did a fantastic job, his absolute passion, to return the circuit to life, those photos of it being an Army truck dump are fascinating. He created the much missed museum for his collection and we mustn't forget his grand prix, Senna in the rain, think Tom lost £5 Mill that weekend, but he said it was worth it.
 

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026 would rise from the ashes and do much better the following year.
As #19 with the 4.9 motor and finned tail, it finished second at the Sarthe in 71 for Atwood/Muller, this is as released by NSR last year.
Like several others it had a haircut, roof removed for sale to Boeri sport helmet racing, pale green with a red arrowed nose it was pedalled without much success by Ernst Knaus.
Subsequently purchased in 73 by Vasek Polak it has been returned to 71 spec and was most recently owned by a Swiss collector.
 

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Interesting to speculate what might have happened had Bruce sadly not succumbed at Goodwood.
Mclaren were looking into producing road cars at the time, how would that have developed, could Bruce have got an engine programme together to rival the Porsche turbo, if there was a better head to head battle would the Can am glory years have lasted a little longer.
If still involved in Can am would Porsche have still produced group 5 and group 6 cars.
 

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Seem to remember it being a works mobil sponsored 911 gt1 /98, think it was in the states, possibly Mc nish driving.
Exactly the same issue, following another car closely, either crested the track or pulled out to pass, then the take off and somersault.
 

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Saw Tony and his Moscow witch at Oulton Park, remember it being a very pale green, Satra motors, the sponsor may have been the importers.

The touring car championship that year was retail price based for the various classes, it was a mater of the biggest engine for the least cost, hence the Moscow witch ran, think they were 1500 cc.

Must say the most entertaining races I remember from those days were for the Ford Mexico championship, some of the driving makes the current btcc mob look like nuns.
 

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Went to see the schlumph collection in 1983 on a classic cars magazine tour. Several, many of the cars had no engine or chassis number, so I surmised they hadn't necessarily been obtained through the correct channels, seem to recall they had several Royals, including ettores personal one.
The tour also took in the Porsche and Mercedes museums.
 

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Powerboats in Bristol docks, we were on hols in Weston Super mare, think it was 1973, dad took us up the M5 to watch, remember thinking what a massive accident contact with the dockside could be.
 

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A very long and incredibly complex story, with no single answer.

The rot really set in, IMHO, at the end of WW2, British manufacturing infrastructure was clapped out, really needed massive investment, but the mass of the proletariat voted for the little money available to be spent elsewhere, catching up would take a very long time.

The BMC merger led to serious internal policy and politics dispute at management level which didn't help.
Longbridge and Cowley weren't the best of mates.
Inter factory transfers of parts/ bodyshells was time consuming and uneconomic.
The mini made virtually no profit, warranty claims were excessive.

Along came the 1100, totally different policy to ford, quickly became the best selling car in the UK, basically until the initial problems with the mk 3 cortina were resolved in 1972.
BMC were were forced by Tony Benn to merge with the more profitable Leyland group.

Lord Leyland Atlantean stokes wasn't particularly keen, but it all went ahead, Stokes wasn't overly impressed with the BMC maxi about to be launched, he ordered a new front end, but couldn't do much about the cable operated gearbox for a year or so.

One of ford's top designers was lured in, that's why the mini clubman front end looks like a mk 2 cortina, he proposed a limited platform approach for the group, like that which is today so very profitable andsuccessful for VAG, board said no, so off he went.

BL quickly needed a fleet car, cash wash limited so the Marina was hashed up from the parts bin, even so it sold quite well, it was only intended to be a stop gap,hence Morris minor lever arm dampers, it was meant to rival the mk2 cortina, but delays meant by the time it launched, ford had moved the class up half a size.

The Austin / Morris 1300 was still selling well, but had little time or money spent on development, it was crying out for a hatchback, but soldiered on until the allegro.
Harris Manns styling sketches were much sharper and with more rake to the design than what came out, due to the height of the e series engine.

Leyland problems of union action happened elsewhere too, but ford made cars that sold, that equalled profits, which could pay the workforce more, Leyland had much more capacity than they were building/selling.

Many exciting and class leading models were designed and prototyped, but from there the problem was twofold, little or no money to develop them, but also Leyland were very worried about taking sales off themselves, particularly between Rover and Triumph.

Concerned about American legislation the ageing sports car fizzled out, the TR 7 came as fixed head only at first.
These problems went on and on for years during sucssesive management changes and company names.

Too many marques, models, factories, too little money to develop new models, fortunes stated to be turned around with the Honda liason, 200,400,600,800, but BMW coming on board, for a very short time really, saw politics at BMW board level wash there hands of what they called the British patient, taking the forth coming jewel in the crown, the new mini and importantly that brand with it.

The rival bid to the phoenix four, think it was called Alchemy, was much more realistic, fewer cars, fewer factories to make economic sense, but that meant fewer jobs in the socialist West Midlands, not exactly a vote winner, so it didn't stand a chance.

Future cars were styled and indeed prototyped, a tie up with Walkinshaw showed great promise, until he went bankrupt, attempts for a Chinese tie up started, but the Chinese realised they could pick up the remanents of MG Rover very cheaply, rather than getting into bed with them.

A long and sorry story, many could say they are guilty in one way or another, management, workforce, Governments, no one of these is wholly to blame, though the social engineering of the late fifties and early sixties to force manufacturers to expand into areas of high unemployment didn't help either.

Rootes to Linwood, to justify investment in the new Scottish steel strip Mills, Ford, Vauxhall and Leyland ended up in Liverpool, Leyland trucks and tractors to Bathgate, all good intent, but getting Ship builders and Dockers to adapt to the shift work and monotomy of building cars was always a tall order.

There's a great online site covering prototypes and models development, called aro online, thoroughly recommended.
 

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Here in North Staffordshire butties come a poor second to local oatcakes ,a sort of savoury pancake,usually cheese,with a choice of bacon, sausage,mushrooms,fried egg,beans or tomatoes as a filling,nearest description is a French galette.
 

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Jag mania was unbelievable, at the track, in the town, in Carrefour at the centre commerciale sud.
Remember seeing a mk 1 spitfire hand painted in Silk Cut colours, probably Dulux paint, at the circuit.
I'd driven down for the race in a 1956 MGA roadster, driving back up the main road to Caen for the ferry on the Monday morning, folks were smiling and waving as we drove through the villages, Falaise, Sees, Alencon etc, they seemed pleased for a jag win.
 
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