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Discussion Starter · #501 ·
Yes, please, Keith. Always enjoy them. The vid at Donington is interesting. It features cars I know very well, but the number of spectators can almost be counted on the fingers of two hands.

Have people lost interest? Much the same picture at other club events.
 

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No car parks were well full, I tend to go to the infield section more or less opposite Starkey's Bridge. It's quite high up so good for getting clear sweeping videos, and good photos, without the safety fencing getting in the way. Also as it's not the most popular area no other people blocking the view or walking in front of the cameras. You can see all the way from the Old Hairpin to Mcleans, although you loose a small bit of Shwantz curve. Can get a bit chilly as no shelter from the wind.

The busy part is from Wheatcroft Straight around to Hollywood on the outside and from Hollywood to Craner Curves on the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #503 ·
Keith

Watching your Donington vid above, or any other clip of the circuit, always reminds me of that extraordinary accident years ago when Keith Odor lost it. Remember?

His car cleared the high fence and landed in the spectator enclosure - thankfully without harm to anyone.

There's a clip on YouTube if you can stand listening to Murray.
 

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Love Donnington, it's just a short run along the A50 from us here in Alton, I appreciate it both as a track for viewing and as a feel, somehow it still feels clubby, less commercial.

I think Jonathan Palmers team have done a great job after the fiasco of the failed grand prix bid, complete with their no spectator cars at the track lunacy.

First went mid seventies when it had just reopened for a classic cars magazine classic car show, it was in the middle, absolutely surrounded by trees, shame they've all gone but it improves viewing.

Its had just about all the series over the years, remember DTM, ETC with the Texaco Eggenberger sierras, WEC with Jags Sauber and 962s,it always has a good turn out for Btcc, gt3 and historics.

Once upon a time you could park on the infield, you went in under the tunnel by the exhibition centre, now car auctions but originally a WW2 shadow factory, Rolls Royce I think.
Tom did a fantastic job, his absolute passion, to return the circuit to life, those photos of it being an Army truck dump are fascinating. He created the much missed museum for his collection and we mustn't forget his grand prix, Senna in the rain, think Tom lost £5 Mill that weekend, but he said it was worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #505 ·
A Wheatcroft yarn as follows:

Tom drove to Jo Siffert's house to buy a racing car for the museum. Siffert had got builders in the garage when Tom arrived.

Siffert and Wheatcroft discussed the car but Tom was constantly distracted from conversation by the builders, who weren't working in the manner that Tom had learned many years earlier.

Eventually, Tom could stand it no longer and took over the plastering himself...
 

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Discussion Starter · #506 ·
Regrettably, these are the only pics I've got of the 1.5-litre Sokol Type 650 F2 car. Built in 1947 in the German Democratic Republic by the Autonobiltechnisches Buro, it is sometimes considered as the 'E-Type' Auto-Union. Built by Walter Trager and Otto Seldan, it never competed in an event due to the prevailing political climate.
 

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I think that one is 2 litres unblown, built for the F2 regs at the time whereas the E type A-U was to be a blown 1.5 litre engine for F1? There is a remarkable thread on the Autosport Nostalgia Forum starting in 2000 and reading like a John Le Carre thriller about the discovery of the history of this. Worth reading if you have a spare two hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #509 ·
All epochs of F1 have excited me, and they still do. Occasionally, there are races that appear to be dull and processional, but there is still nothing to equal the sight, sound and paraphernalia of it all.

From the least, to the most, powerful cars, there's always something to produce secretions of adrenaline. I understand the views of armchair critics who moan that it's all boring, but TV by its very nature, cannot capture the unique experience of actually being there.

Some folk get excited by other sports, including cricket, tooty, darts, snooker and the rest.

I can only surmise that they've never experienced Stowe Corner, Tabac, Eau Rouge, Radillon, Tertre Rouge, Druids, Old Hall, Lodge and blah, blah, blah. I used to feel sorry for such folk but, alas, not any more...
 

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Discussion Starter · #511 ·
HiFi

Couldn't agree more. One helluva ride, eh? A little too much extraneous, and irrelevant, 'paddock' activity for me nowadays, but the real point of it all begins when the red lights change for the green one.
 

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Well put!

Aesthetically, I prefer the pre-***-pack and aerofoil era, no doubt about it.

I also miss the sound of Matra or Ferrari V12's or even some of the the turbo era cars.

But watching the sheer speed - especially through corners - of today's cars is awe inspiring at times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #513 ·
Hi Fi

I noticed during TV coverage last year that a number of cameras were able to convey a sense of current cornering speeds, which I enjoyed so very much. Constantly subjecting drivers to between 2-7G in corners, under braking and acceleration, is out of the ordinary.

On the other hand I used to enjoy good ol' opposite-lock motoring, 250F style. Can't beat it. Oh yes you can...
 

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All epochs of F1 have excited me, and they still do. Occasionally, there are races that appear to be dull and processional, but there is still nothing to equal the sight, sound and paraphernalia of it all.

From the least, to the most, powerful cars, there's always something to produce secretions of adrenaline. I understand the views of armchair critics who moan that it's all boring, but TV by its very nature, cannot capture the unique experience of actually being there.

Some folk get excited by other sports, including cricket, tooty, darts, snooker and the rest.

I can only surmise that they've never experienced Stowe Corner, Tabac, Eau Rouge, Radillon, Tertre Rouge, Druids, Old Hall, Lodge and blah, blah, blah. I used to feel sorry for such folk but, alas, not any more...
I certainly don't limit myself to the 1960s and 70s although as the thread is titled Your Golden Epoch it implies you have to pick one. I also like all eras of the sport from the very earliest days of the 1900s through to 2021 and love watching the current Grands Prix.

Hi Fi

I noticed during TV coverage last year that a number of cameras were able to convey a sense of current cornering speeds, which I enjoyed so very much. Constantly subjecting drivers to between 2-7G in corners, under braking and acceleration, is out of the ordinary.

On the other hand I used to enjoy good ol' opposite-lock motoring, 250F style. Can't beat it. Oh yes you can...
The best place I have spectated at for incredible turn in and cornering speed is at Copse Corner, You can line up the F1 cars coming straight towards you along the original pit straight and the initial change of direction is amazing as is the speed they carry through the corner.

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #515 ·
Copse! Probably the fastest 90-degree-right today. It was mastered by ground-effect in the mid 1980s. It almost, but not quite, defies physics. Terrifying.

Glad I'm old and that I've been sufficiently lucky to have witnessed the zenith of automotive evolution from fairly early days.

The motor car is dead. I look forward to its demise. Long live the motor car.
 

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I've dug out a few of my snaps from an F1 test at Silverstone in 2006. These were taken at Copse to try and illustrate what I was saying in my previous post.

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Automotive tire


Kimi approaching Copse at top speed and just starting to turn in.

Tire Car Wheel Vehicle Helmet


A little further into the corner and you can just see the car loading up and the rear tyre starting to distort due to the high forces.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire


Alonso mid corner still at more or less top speed and the rear tyre now really suffering due to the incredible cornering forces.

Still photos don't really convey the speed but I have great memories of standing at this point and seeing these cars at alarming speed.

David
 

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Interesting photo's David. The suspension movement is clearly extremely small. In the early 1980's I was at a test day at Donington Park and there was an F1 Williams there for a thrash.It had Rosberg's name on it but I don't think he was there though. Looking at the suspension, the shock absorber struts were polished up for about 6 mm only, showing the very limited bump travel. Even allowing for the angle of the shocker, this amounts to about 8 or 9 mm vertical bump travel at the wheel. The tyres must have done most of the work then too.
 
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